Standards for private organizations

2020 Edition

Refugee Resettlement Services (RRS) 2: Personnel

Program personnel and volunteers have the competency and support needed to provide services and meet the needs of persons served.

Interpretation

Competency can be demonstrated through education, training, or experience. Support can be provided through supervision or other learning activities to improve understanding or skill development in specific areas.
2020 Edition

Currently viewing: REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT SERVICES (RRS)

VIEW THE STANDARDS

Purpose

Refugees acquire the cross-cultural information, skills, and social support network needed to gain stability, make a positive personal and social adjustment, maintain family connections and well-being, and achieve educational, economic and civic participation goals.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,  
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised; or
  • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to the few staff without the listed qualifications; or 
  • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them; or 
  • With few exceptions, staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth; or
  • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions; or
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies when needed; or
  • With few exceptions, caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards or as required by internal policy when caseload has not been set by a standard; or
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services and are adjusted as necessary; or
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • A significant number of staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) do not possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result, the integrity of the service may be compromised; or
  • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur; or 
  • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications; or
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training documentation is poorly maintained; or
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies; or
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements or the requirements of internal policy when a caseload size is not set by the standard; or
  • Workloads are excessive, and the integrity of the service may be compromised; or 
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Table of contents of training curricula
  • Procedures or other documentation relevant to continuity of care and case assignment
  • Sample job descriptions from across relevant job categories 
  • Documentation tracking staff completion of required trainings and/or competencies
  • Training curricula
  • Caseload size requirements set by policy, regulation, or contract, when applicable
  • Documentation of current caseload per worker
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
  • Review personnel files

RRS 2.01

Supervisors are qualified by an advanced degree in social work or in a related human service field and have:  
  1. experience in resettlement services; 
  2. the skills to evaluate the ability and readiness of service recipients to cope with a new society; and
  3. the ability to mobilize resources to help service recipients in the community.

Interpretation

Appropriate experience and specialized training can compensate for a lack of advanced degree depending on the program design.

RRS 2.02

Supervisors are trained on, or demonstrate competency in, understanding and overcoming issues that interfere with developing a professional relationship with service recipients and other barriers to service provision for refugees.

RRS 2.03

Direct service personnel are trained on, or demonstrate competency in: 
  1. understanding salient factors in the resettlement process; and
  2. recognizing conflicts inherent to acculturation.

RRS 2.04

Personnel working in any part of a service delivery system that offers services to refugee children are trained on, or demonstrate competency in: 
  1. recognizing obstacles to service delivery based on differences with service recipients; 
  2. learning about unique difficulties encountered in a child’s and family’s migration experience; 
  3. working within the cultural practices and expectations of the child’s and family’s society of origin; 
  4. recognizing parents’ customary sources of support, the loss of such support, and any reservations about involvement with public agencies and service providers; and 
  5. incorporating approaches that have proven successful in programs serving separated refugee minor children.

RRS 2.05

Individuals who have a background in common with service recipients and are employed to support service delivery: 
  1. have job roles that are clearly defined; 
  2. work collaboratively with other trained direct service personnel; and 
  3. receive the training and supervision necessary to act as an effective bridge between different cultures.
NA The organization does not employ individuals who share a common background with service recipients to support service delivery.
Examples: Cultural brokering – bridging, linking or mediating between groups or persons of differing cultural backgrounds – is an effective way to facilitate the collection of accurate information. Community members that have knowledge of the values, beliefs and practices of a specific cultural or linguistic group, known as cultural brokers, serve as liaisons between the service recipient and provider by communicating in a cross-cultural context. Culturally similar program staff and/or trained volunteers can fill this role provided confidentiality of information is maintained.

RRS 2.06

Employee workloads support the achievement of client outcomes and are regularly reviewed.
Examples: Factors that may be considered when determining employee workloads include, but are not limited to: 
  1. the qualifications and competencies of direct service personnel and supervisors; 
  2. case complexity; 
  3. case status, and progress toward achievement of desired outcomes; 
  4. whether services are provided by multiple individuals and providers or teams; and
  5. relevant cultural and religious factors.