Standards for private organizations

2020 Edition

Risk Prevention and Management (RPM) 2: Risk Prevention and Management

The organization identifies and reduces potential loss and liability by:
  1. conducting prevention and risk reduction activities; and
  2. monitoring and evaluating risk prevention and management effectiveness.
2020 Edition

Currently viewing: RISK PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT (RPM)

VIEW THE STANDARDS

Purpose

Comprehensive, systematic, and effective risk prevention and management practices sustain the organization's ability to positively impact the communities and people it serves by reducing its risk, loss, and liability exposure.
1
The organization's practices fully meet the standard, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the RPM 2 Practice standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the RPM 2 Practice standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the RPM 2 Practice standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the RPM 2 Practices standards.
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Procedures for quarterly review of immediate and ongoing risks
  • Procedures for investigation and review of critical incidents
  • Quarterly risk management reports
  • Results of independent investigations of critical incidents
  • Governing body and management meeting minutes where risk prevention and management activities are reviewed
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Governing Body
    2. CEO
    3. Relevant personnel

 
Fundamental Practice

RPM 2.01

The organization conducts a quarterly review of immediate and ongoing risks that includes a review of incidents, critical incidents, accidents, and grievances including the following, as appropriate to the program or service:
  1. facility safety issues;
  2. serious illness, injuries, and deaths;
  3. situations where a person was determined to be a danger to himself/herself or others;
  4. service modalities or other organizational practices that involve risk or limit freedom of choice; and
  5. the use of restrictive behavior management interventions, such as seclusion and restraint.
FEC

Interpretation

In credit counseling organizations, only elements (a) through (c) could potentially apply.

EAP

Interpretation

In employee assistance programs, only elements (a) through (c) could potentially apply.
Note: Results of the quarterly reviews may inform the annual insurance needs assessment in RPM 3.01.
1
The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g.,
  • Reviews are conducted quarterly but one of the elements is not fully addressed.
3
Practice requires significant improvement; e.g.,
  • The organization conducts reviews less than quarterly; or
  • Two elements are not fully addressed; or
  • One element is not addressed at all.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all.

 
Fundamental Practice

RPM 2.02

The organization conducts a review of each incident, serious occurrence, accident, and grievance that involves the threat of or actual harm, serious injury, or death; and review procedures:
  1. require that the investigation be initiated within 24 hours of the incident and/or accident being reported and establish timeframes for completing the review;
  2. require solicitation of statements from all involved individuals;
  3. ensure an independent review;
  4. require timely implementation and documentation of all actions taken;
  5. address ongoing monitoring if actions are required and assessing their effectiveness; and
  6. address applicable reporting requirements.
Examples: Root cause analysis can be a useful approach to reviewing serious incidents and accidents. Root cause analysis is a term used to describe a variety of techniques used by organizations to identify the cause of a problem and determine how to prevent that problem from recurring.
1
The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g.,
  • Review procedures need strengthening; or
  • One of the elements is not fully addressed; or
  • Documentation could be improved.
3
Practice requires significant improvement; e.g.,
  • One of the elements is not addressed at all; or
  • While reviews are generally conducted, documentation is consistently missing; or
  • There is evidence that at least one serious incident was not reviewed.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all.