Standards for private organizations

2020 Edition

Juvenile Justice Day Services (JJD) 2: Personnel

Program personnel have the competency and support needed to provide services and meet the needs of youth.

Interpretation

 Competency can be demonstrated through education, training, or experience. Support can be provided through supervision or other learning activities to improve understanding or skill development in specific areas.
2020 Edition

Currently viewing: JUVENILE JUSTICE DAY SERVICES (JJD)

VIEW THE STANDARDS

Purpose

Juvenile Justice Day Services promote public safety and reduce the need for out-of-home placements by allowing youth to reside in their communities while they address problems and develop the attitudes and skills needed to make responsible choices, avoid negative behaviors, and become productive, connected, and law-abiding members of their communities.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,  
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised; or
  • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to the few staff without the listed qualifications; or 
  • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them; or 
  • With few exceptions, staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth; or
  • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions; or
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies when needed; or
  • With few exceptions, caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards or as required by internal policy when caseload has not been set by a standard; or
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services and are adjusted as necessary; or
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • A significant number of staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) do not possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result, the integrity of the service may be compromised; or
  • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur; or 
  • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications; or
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training documentation is poorly maintained; or
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies; or
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements or the requirements of internal policy when a caseload size is not set by the standard; or
  • Workloads are excessive, and the integrity of the service may be compromised; or 
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Table of contents of training curricula
  • Procedures or other documentation relevant to continuity of care and case assignment
  • Sample job descriptions from across relevant job categories
  • Documentation tracking staff completion of required trainings and/or competencies
  • Training curricula
  • Caseload size requirements set by policy, regulation, or contract, when applicable
  • Documentation of current caseload size per worker, if applicable

 

  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
  • Review personnel files
  • Verify employment of or contract with professionals providing specialized services, if applicable

 

JJD 2.01

Personnel providing youth care and supervision are qualified by at least:
  1. two years of college in a social or human service field; or
  2. a high school degree or equivalent and at least two years of experience working with youth.

 

JJD 2.02

Case managers are qualified by:
  1. an advanced degree in a social or human service field; or
  2. a bachelor’s degree in a social or human service field and experience working with youth.

 

JJD 2.03

Supervisors are qualified by:
  1. an advanced degree in a social or human service field; or
  2. a bachelor's degree in a social or human service field and at least two years of experience working with youth.

 

JJD 2.04

Qualified professionals and specialists provide any needed services related to:
  1. mental health;
  2. substance use;
  3. medicine and dentistry;
  4. nursing; and
  5. education.
NA The program is not designed to provide or coordinate these services.

 

JJD 2.05

All direct service personnel are trained on, or demonstrate competency in: 
  1. understanding youth development;
  2. assessing risks and safety;
  3. recognizing and responding to needs, including needs related to health, mental health, and substance use;
  4. appropriate disciplinary techniques;
  5. providing services in a culturally competent manner that considers gender and gender identity, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, developmental level, disability, and other relevant characteristics; and
  6. understanding the different organizations, agencies, and systems likely to serve or encounter youth involved with the juvenile justice system.

 
Fundamental Practice

JJD 2.06

There is at least one person certified in basic first aid and CPR on duty at each program site, at any time the program is in operation.

 

JJD 2.07

The organization maintains service continuity by:
  1. assigning a worker at intake or early in the contact;
  2. avoiding the arbitrary or indiscriminate reassignment of direct service personnel; and
  3. using a team approach to ensure a comprehensive, integrated approach to service delivery and supervision.

 

JJD 2.08

Employee workloads support the achievement of youth outcomes and are regularly reviewed.
Examples: Factors that may be considered when determining employee workloads include, but are not limited to:
  1. the qualifications, competencies, and experience of personnel, including the level of supervision needed;
  2. case complexity and status, including the intensity of youths’ risks and needs;
  3. the work and time required to accomplish assigned tasks and job responsibilities;
  4. whether services are provided by multiple professionals or team members; and
  5. service volume.