Standards for child and youth development programs

2021 Edition

Human Resources (HR) 6: Volunteers

The organization recruits and retains a competent and qualified volunteer pool.
NA The organization does not use direct service volunteers, student professionals, or interns. 

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Viewing: HR 6 - Volunteers

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Note:  You are viewing the CYD Standards, a tailored subset of the standards for Private organizations. Click here to view the full list of Private Standards.

Purpose

The organization’s human resources practices attract and retain a competent and qualified workforce that contributes to consumer satisfaction and positive service delivery results and supports the achievement of the organization’s mission and strategic goals.
Related Standards:
1
The organization's practices fully meet the standard, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the HR 6 Practice standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the HR 6 Practice standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the HR 6 Practice standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the HR 6 Practice standards.
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Procedures for developing and reviewing volunteer/intern assignments
  • Volunteer/intern supervision procedures
  • Sample volunteer/intern assignments from across categories
  • Documentation tracking volunteer/intern completion of required trainings
  • Interview:
    1. Personnel responsible for recruitment and supervision of volunteers/interns
    2. Volunteers/Interns
  • Review volunteer/intern records

 

HR 6.01

A written assignment is developed, and periodically reviewed, for each volunteer, student professional, and intern position that includes:
  1. duties;
  2. time commitment;
  3. responsibilities and prohibited activities;
  4. required skill sets, credentials, or trainings; and
  5. lines of supervision and the process for providing ongoing feedback.

Interpretation

Written assignments for student professional and interns should be provided by the placing organization.
Examples: Organizations can support appropriate assignments for prospective volunteers by using an interview process that includes, for example, consideration of their skills, interests, abilities, relevant experience, and availability; and matching those with the available volunteer opportunities at the organization.
1
The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g.,
  • Written volunteer/intern assignments require greater clarity; or
  • One of the standard's elements is not fully addressed.
3
Practice requires significant improvement; e.g.,
  • For some volunteer/intern assignments roles and responsibilities are only communicated verbally; or
  • Two of the standard's elements are not fully addressed; or
  • One of the standard's elements is not addressed at all.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all.

 

HR 6.02

Direct service volunteers, student professionals, and interns are:
  1. directly supervised by licensed or otherwise accountable professionals;
  2. appropriately trained to fulfill their role; and
  3. participate in regular discussions and receive feedback regarding their performance.
Examples: When determining methods and timelines for providing regular feedback, the organization may consider the qualifications and experiences of the volunteer, educational requirements for students, and the complexity and intensity of the assignment.
1
The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g.,
  • With few exceptions volunteers, etc. are supervised as per the standard.
3
Practice requires significant improvement; e.g.,
  • A significant number of volunteers, etc. are not appropriately supervised; or
  • Documentation of supervision is poorly maintained or nonexistent.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all.