Standards for private organizations

2020 Edition

Disaster Recovery Case Management (DRCM) 2: Personnel

Program personnel have the competency and support needed to access and coordinate services and meet the needs of individuals and families.

Interpretation

Competency can be demonstrated through education, training, or experience and may vary based on the organization’s mission, programs, and requirements. Support can be provided through supervision or other learning activities to improve understanding or skill development in specific areas.
2020 Edition

Currently viewing: DISASTER RECOVERY CASE MANAGEMENT (DRCM)

VIEW THE STANDARDS

Purpose

Individuals and families who receive Disaster Recovery Case Management services access and use resources and support that build on their strengths and meet their service needs.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,  
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised; or
  • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to the few staff without the listed qualifications; or 
  • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them; or 
  • With few exceptions, staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth; or
  • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions; or
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies when needed; or
  • With few exceptions, caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards or as required by internal policy when caseload has not been set by a standard; or
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services and are adjusted as necessary; or
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • A significant number of staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) do not possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result, the integrity of the service may be compromised; or
  • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur; or 
  • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications; or
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training documentation is poorly maintained; or
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies; or
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements or the requirements of internal policy when a caseload size is not set by the standard; or
  • Workloads are excessive, and the integrity of the service may be compromised; or 
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Table of contents of training curricula
  • Sample job descriptions from across relevant job categories
  • Training curricula
  • Documentation tracking staff completion of required trainings and/or competencies
  • Caseload size requirements set by policy, regulation, or contract, when applicable
  • Documentation of current caseload size per worker
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
  • Review personnel files

 

DRCM 2.01

Case managers are qualified by completion of a disaster recovery case management specific curriculum and have the experience, personal qualities, case management skills, and current competencies to work effectively with the populations served.
Examples: Direct service providers may be selected for their ability to handle stressful situations including personal qualities such as:
  1. empathy, maturity, judgment, and alertness to warning signs of potential crisis;
  2. supportiveness and a strengths focus;
  3. sensitivity to the needs of individuals and families in crisis;
  4. awareness of the impact of the disaster on the community; and
  5. cultural and linguistic competence relative to the population served.

 

DRCM 2.02

Supervisors of case managers are qualified by:
  1. completion of a disaster recovery case management curriculum for supervisors; and 
  2. human services experience including at least four years of supervised experience providing case management or disaster recovery case management services.

 

DRCM 2.03

Case managers are trained on, or demonstrate competency in:    
  1. the role of case management in a disaster;
  2. linking clients and making referrals to community services;
  3. case advocacy and case presentation; 
  4. disaster relief resources, planning, and procedures;
  5. disaster terminology;
  6. stages of disaster response and recovery;
  7. the disaster declaration process;
  8. local, state and federal responses to disaster to include the “sequence of delivery” for governmental assistance;
  9. long-term recovery groups;
  10. methods to promote empowering client recovery efforts;
  11. conducting disaster-related screening and needs assessments;
  12. developing disaster recovery plans;
  13. record keeping and data management for emergency situations; and
  14. self care.

 

DRCM 2.04

Case managers are knowledgeable about current eligibility requirements and application processes, including:
  1. how to determine eligibility; and
  2. specific registration or procedural application sequences required to avoid duplication or loss of benefits.
NA Eligibility requirements are not in force or do not apply.

 

DRCM 2.05

Supervisors prevent, identify, and address stress, anxiety, secondary traumatic stress, and vicarious trauma among direct service staff by:
  1. processing and debriefing with staff following a crisis or traumatic event;
  2. creating an atmosphere of problem-solving and learning;
  3. providing constructive ways to approach difficult situations with service recipients; and
  4. facilitating regular feedback, growth opportunities, and a structure for ongoing communication and collaboration.

 

DRCM 2.06

Case management supervisors monitor, communicate, and take action regarding:
  1. the support and training needs and effectiveness of case management staff;
  2. the prioritization of client needs, and status and support of recovery plan goals;
  3. the development and processes of disaster specific resources; and
  4. the need for networking and collaboration with agencies and community providers.

 

DRCM 2.07

A supervisor or case manager is available to provide case consultation whenever services are provided.

 

DRCM 2.08

Caseload sizes are sufficiently small to permit case managers to respond flexibly to differing service needs of individuals and families, including frequency of contact, and to support the achievement of client outcomes.
Examples: Factors that may be considered when determining employee workloads include, but are not limited to:
  1. the qualifications, competencies, and experience of the worker including the level of supervision needed;
  2. the work and time required to accomplish assigned tasks and job responsibilities; and
  3. service volume, accounting for assessed level of needs of individuals and families.