Standards for Canadian organizations

2020 Edition

Supervised Visitation and Exchange Services (CA-SVE) 2: Personnel

Program personnel have the competency and support needed to provide services and meet the needs of the target population.

Interpretation

Competency can be demonstrated through education, training, or experience. Support can be provided through supervision or other learning activities to improve understanding or skill development in specific areas.
2020 Edition

Currently viewing: SUPERVISED VISITATION AND EXCHANGE SERVICES (CA-SVE)

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Purpose

Supervised Visitation and Exchange Services enable children to maintain connections with parents with whom they are not living by protecting the physical and emotional safety of the children and their families.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,  
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised; or
  • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to the few staff without the listed qualifications; or 
  • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them; or 
  • With few exceptions, staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth; or
  • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions; or
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies when needed; or
  • With few exceptions, caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards or as required by internal policy when caseload has not been set by a standard; or
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services and are adjusted as necessary; or
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • A significant number of staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) do not possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result, the integrity of the service may be compromised; or
  • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur; or 
  • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications; or
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training documentation is poorly maintained; or
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies; or
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements or the requirements of internal policy when a caseload size is not set by the standard; or
  • Workloads are excessive, and the integrity of the service may be compromised; or 
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Table of contents of training curricula
  • Sample job descriptions from across relevant job categories
  • Documentation tracking staff completion of required trainings and/or competencies
  • Training curricula
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
  • Review personnel files

 

CA-SVE 2.01

All personnel supervising visits or exchanges are trained on, or demonstrate competency in:
  1. understanding and monitoring cases involving child abuse and neglect, including sexual abuse;
  2. understanding and monitoring cases involving domestic violence;
  3. understanding and monitoring cases involving mental health issues and/or substance use conditions;
  4. understanding what children of different ages and developmental stages may need during supervised contact, and how they may respond to services;
  5. understanding positive parenting skills and behaviours;
  6. understanding how separation and divorce may affect the way children and parents respond during supervised visitation;
  7. understanding the grief and loss associated with the removal of a child from the home;
  8. understanding the social service systems with which families are likely to come into contact, including child protection, law enforcement, and the courts;
  9. understanding relevant laws and regulations, including those related to visitation and exchange, child protection, family violence, and custody; and
  10. appropriately documenting visits and exchanges.
Examples: Topics relevant to cases involving domestic violence include, but are not limited to: the dynamics of domestic violence, including the fundamentals of power and coercive control; the potential impact of domestic violence on children; safety concerns that may arise when a victim attempts to separate from a perpetrator; legal remedies in domestic violence cases, including orders of protection; and behaviours common to perpetrators, including how these behaviours may be manifested during supervised visitation or exchange. Behaviours common to perpetrators include, but are not limited to: denying the abuse or attempting to blame it on the victim; making disparaging comments about the victim; trying to extract information from the children about the victim; trying to send messages to the victim through the children; ignoring program rules; refusing to pay for visits; or trying to charm staff in an attempt to influence their actions or decisions.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-SVE 2.02

Personnel providing off-site supervision are experienced in providing supervised contact and are trained on, or demonstrate competency in, managing the risks associated with off-site supervision, including:
  1. use of bathrooms by both service recipients and personnel;
  2. seating arrangements; 
  3. dealing with intervening persons;
  4. recognizing when a person may be in an agitated state or present a danger;
  5. accessing emergency assistance; and
  6. transporting service recipients, when applicable.
NA The organization does not provide off-site supervision.

 

CA-SVE 2.03

Personnel providing therapeutic supervised visitation are trained on, or demonstrate competency in:
  1. implementing evidence based practices and understanding other relevant emerging bodies of knowledge;
  2. establishing a strong bond with service recipients;
  3. understanding child development and individual and family functioning;
  4. mobilizing individual and family strengths;
  5. recognizing and working with individuals with co-occurring health, mental health, and substance use conditions; 
  6. understanding psychosocial and ecological or person-in-environment perspectives; and
  7. determining when to involve a psychiatrist.

Interpretation

Services may also be provided by a student or intern in training for a post-graduate degree working under the direct supervision of a licensed mental health professional.
NA The organization does not provide therapeutic supervised visitation.

 

CA-SVE 2.04

When feedback, education, or discussion are incorporated into supervised contact, personnel are trained on, or demonstrate competency in: 
  1. implementing interventions that promote change; and
  2. recognizing when the assistance provided is causing potential harm to children or other family members.
NA The organization does not incorporate feedback, education, or discussion into supervised contact.

 

CA-SVE 2.05

Personnel managing the supervised visitation and exchange program are trained on, or demonstrate competency in:
  1. receiving referrals and conducting intake and orientation;
  2. establishing conditions for service participation and fees for service;
  3. setting up physical space to promote safety;
  4. managing and reviewing cases;
  5. suspending or terminating services;
  6. collaborating with the court and other referring agencies; and
  7. testifying in court.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-SVE 2.06

Personnel providing therapeutic supervised visitation are licensed or registered mental health or social work professionals.

Interpretation

Services may also be provided by a student or intern in training for a post-graduate degree working under the direct supervision of a licensed or registered mental health or social work professional.
NA The organization does not provide therapeutic supervised visitation.

 

CA-SVE 2.07

Supervisors of personnel providing therapeutic supervised visitation are licensed or registered mental health or social work professionals with at least two years of experience providing services to children and families.
NA The organization does not provide therapeutic supervised visitation.

 

CA-SVE 2.08

Within 12 months of hire personnel are trained according to the following requirements:
  1. 24 hours for personnel who supervise visits;
  2. 16 hours for personnel who only supervise exchanges; 
  3. 40 hours for personnel who supervise off-site visits or exchanges; and
  4. 40 hours for personnel who manage the program.

Interpretation

Personnel who have not yet completed the required training are only permitted to monitor parent-child contacts under the supervision of fully-trained personnel.
Examples: Training often includes a practicum component that consists of shadowing, co-supervision with trained personnel, and observation of the trainee. Topics to be covered during training can include those addressed in CA-SVE 2.01 through CA-SVE 2.05, as appropriate to the position.

 

CA-SVE 2.09

Employee workloads support the achievement of outcomes and are regularly reviewed.
Examples: Factors that may be considered when determining employee workloads include, but are not limited to:
  1. the qualifications, competencies, and experience of the worker, including the level of supervision needed; 
  2. the work and time required to accomplish assigned tasks and job responsibilities; and
  3. service volume, accounting for assessed level of needs of persons served.