Standards for Canadian organizations

2020 Edition

Human Resources (CA-HR) 3: Satisfaction and Retention

Human resources practices are equitable and consistently applied and promote a high level of personnel satisfaction and retention.
2020 Edition

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Purpose

The organization’s human resources practices attract and retain a competent and qualified workforce that contributes to service recipient satisfaction and positive service delivery results and supports the achievement of the organization’s mission and strategic goals.
Examples: Factors that may contribute to staff satisfaction and retention include:
  1. role clarity;
  2. regular team, organizational, and divisional meetings to promote open communication and collaboration among disciplines and staff levels;
  3. leadership that encourages initiative, creativity, and innovation;
  4. leadership that rewards and recognizes employee contributions;
  5. satisfaction with salary and benefits;
  6. work-life policies and practices, such as flexible work options;
  7. leadership that provides feedback to personnel about their suggestions and recommendations;
  8. reasonable workload;
  9. autonomy;
  10. opportunities for advancement; and
  11. opportunities for career development.
Note: Please see the Personnel Records Checklist for additional guidance on this standard.
1
The organization's practices fully meet the standard, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the CA-HR 3 Practice standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the CA-HR 3 Practice standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the CA-HR 3 Practice standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the CA-HR 3 Practice standards.
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Summary results of most recent staff satisfaction survey
  • Summary results of most recent staff retention analysis
  • Table of Contents for personnel policies and procedures manual
  • Personnel grievance procedrues
  • Documentation of actions taken to address satisfaction and retention concerns
  • Personnel policies and procedures manual
  • Grievance reports for the past six months
  • Interviews may include:
    1. CEO
    2. Governing Body
    3. HR Director
    4. Relevant personnel
  • Review personnel records

CA-HR 3.01

The organization annually measures personnel satisfaction and retention and takes action to address identified satisfaction and retention concerns.
1
The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g.,
  • Satisfaction and/or retention are not formally measured for a few departments and/or programs.
3
Practice requires significant improvement; e.g.,
  • Satisfaction and/or retention are not formally measured for a number of the organization's departments or programs;
  • Staff satisfaction and/or retention has not been formally measured for more than two years; or
  • The organization collects data on staff satisfaction and turnover but does not take action to address concerns; or
  • Retention data has been aggregated but there is no indication of how it is used.
4
The organization does not measure staff satisfaction and/ or retention.

CA-HR 3.02

All personnel confirm receipt of an up-to-date personnel policies and procedures manual that articulates current:
  1. conditions of employment;
  2. benefits;
  3. rights and responsibilities of employees; and
  4. other important employment-related information.
Examples: Policies and procedures that are commonly addressed in a personnel manual include:
  1. conditions of employment, including employee benefits, leaves of absence, including layoffs and termination of employment;
  2. emergency and safety procedures;
  3. employment equity policies;
  4. harassment and discrimination;
  5. nepotism and favouritism protections;
  6. grievance procedures;
  7. insurance protections;
  8. performance appraisal system;
  9. promotions;
  10. professional development;
  11. standards of conduct;
  12. wage policy;
  13. working conditions;
  14. technology/network security and usage policies; and
  15. the use of social media, electronic communications, and mobile devices.
1
The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g.,
  • All personnel receive the manual but a few of the organization’s procedures are vaguely written or incomplete.
3
Practice requires significant improvement; e.g.,
  • A few personnel report not having a copy of, or access to, the manual; or
  • The manual does not include a few important polices or procedures; or
  • Polices and/or procedures have not been reviewed for more than two years; or
  • A significant number of staff did not confirm receipt of the manual.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all.

CA-HR 3.03

The organization establishes personnel grievance procedures, which include:
  1. the right to file a grievance without interference or retaliation;
  2. a description of how grievances are filed, to whom, and who will make a final determination;
  3. timely written notification of the resolution and an explanation of any further appeal, rights, or recourse;
  4. processes for review including a third-party review of the final determination;
  5. documenting responses and actions taken within a prescribed timeframe; and
  6. maintaining a copy of the notification of resolution in the personnel record.

Interpretation

Regarding element (d), the third-party review refers to at least one level of review that does not involve the person about whom the complaint has been made or the person who reached the decision under review. If a grievance is raised against the CEO, then the grievance will go directly to the governing body.
1
The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g.,
  • One of the required elements is not fully addressed; or
  • In a few instances staff were not aware of the procedures or did not know how to access them.
3
Practice requires significant improvement; e.g., 
•    Two or more of the required elements are not fully addressed; or one element is not addressed at all; or
•    A significant number of staff members were not aware of the procedures or did not know how to access them. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all.

CA-HR 3.04

The organization provides all departing personnel with an opportunity to participate in an exit interview and documents their feedback or exit interview declination in the personnel record.
Examples: This interview can provide an opportunity for personnel to share feedback such as administrative issues related to the transition or input on the organization’s strengths and weaknesses.
1
The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g.,
  • Documentation of exit interviews is not comprehensive and/or used for performance improvement.
3
Practice requires significant improvement; e.g.,
  • Exit interviews are sporadic and/or occur only at the request of the employee.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all.