Standards for Canadian organizations

2020 Edition

Home Care and Support Services (CA-HCS) 8: Coordinated Home Management, Activities of Daily Living, and Health Services

Sufficient community resources are drawn upon and frequently reviewed to provide each individual or family with:
  1. a comprehensive package of services; and
  2. a flexible approach to service delivery that meets their changing needs.
2020 Edition

Currently viewing: HOME CARE AND SUPPORT SERVICES (CA-HCS)

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Purpose

Individuals who receive Home Care and Support Services obtain a maximum level of independence, functioning, and health, and extend the time it is possible to live safely at home and in the community.
Examples: A service “package” refers to the number and combination of different services, and volume of care. This perspective acknowledges that users of services are a diverse group who need a variety of services with varying combinations and frequencies.

Examples: Services provided directly or by a cooperating provider can include:
  1. housekeeping tasks and home management activities and education;
  2. companionship;
  3. chores, safe food handling and storage, and nutritious meal preparation;
  4. assistance with personal care;
  5. monitoring of overall health and well-being including observing, reporting, and documenting changes in bodily function;
  6. assistance with self-administered medications;
  7. assistance or prompting with activities of daily living;
  8. assistance with personalizing homes and purchasing personal necessities;
  9. assistance with ambulation and transfer; and
  10. assistance with accessing community activities, including access to transportation.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
No Self-Study Evidence
  • Community resource and referral list
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Persons served
  • Review case records