WHO IS ACCREDITED?

Private Organization Accreditation

Debt Education and Certification Foundation (DECAF), a private non-profit 501(c)(3) organization, provides high-quality financial education and counseling, with nationwide outreach throughout the U.S. DECAF is HUD-approved, and recognized as one of the 100 Best Companies to Work for in Texas.
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VOLUNTEER TESTIMONIAL

Audrey Coleman, RN-MSN

Volunteer Roles: Military Reviewer; Peer Reviewer; Team Leader

My first experience with COA was in 1999 with what was a NC Area Program. I started as a peer reviewer in 2005, doing two to four site visits a year. I am also a team leader and have recently been approved to be a military reviewer.
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Purpose

Job seekers who receive workforce development, support, and financial asset building services achieve increased economic self-sufficiency through the attainment and retention of jobs in the community and the promotion of asset accumulation.

WDS 9: Personnel

Program personnel have the education, experience, training, and supervision needed to help job seekers progress toward their employment objectives.

Rating Indicators
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,  
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised.
    • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to staff without the listed qualifications.
    • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them.
  • With some exceptions staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth.
    • A few personnel have not yet received required training.
    • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions.
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
    • Supervisors provide structure and support in relation to service outcomes, organizational culture and staff retention.
  • With a few exceptions caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards.
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services, and are adjusted as necessary in accord with established workload procedures.
    • Procedures need strengthening.
    • With few exceptions procedures are understood by staff and are being used.
  • With a few exceptions specialized staff are retained as required and possess the required qualifications.
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • One of the Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.
  • A significant number of staff, e.g., direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers, do not possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result the integrity of the service may be compromised.
    • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur.
    • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications.
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training documentation is poorly maintained.
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements.
  • Workloads are are excessive and the integrity of the service may be compromised. 
    • Procedures need significant strengthening; or
    • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,

For example:
  • Two or more Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.

Table of Evidence

Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
    • Program staffing chart that includes lines of supervision
    • List of personnel that includes:
      1. name;
      2. title;
      3. degree held and/or other credentials;
      4. FTE or volunteer;
      5. length of service at the organization;
      6. time in current position
    • Table of contents of training curricula
    • Procedures and criteria for assigning and evaluating workloads
    • Documentation of training
    • Job descriptions
    • Training curricula
    • Interview:
      1. Supervisors
      2. Relevant personnel
    • Review personnel files

  • WDS 9.01

    Direct service personnel have the appropriate combination of education, training, and supervised experience to provide effective employment placements, and demonstrate competency in:

    1. establishing rapport with service recipients;
    2. coordinating services as part of a team; and
    3. identifying the needs of special populations.

  • WDS 9.02

    Direct service providers receive ongoing training on:

    1. screening topics relevant to the identified service population;
    2. adult learning principles and the diversity of workforce development approaches;
    3. working with youth to explore career opportunities;
    4. interagency confidentiality and professional ethics;
    5. public assistance eligibility requirements, benefits, and how to access them; and
    6. barriers to employment.

  • WDS 9.03

    Direct service personnel who provide financial asset-building services demonstrate competency in:

    1. identifying support networks of family, friends, and community resources;
    2. counseling individuals on any local or state asset limitation regulations and their implications for continued receipt of public assistance;
    3. identifying local programs that provide assistance and incentives for financial asset building; and
    4. overcoming obstacles to asset building for immigrants, refugees, and migrant or seasonal workers, including predatory lending.

    Interpretation: Obstacles to asset building for immigrants, refugees, and migrant or seasonal workers can include a lack of appropriate documentation or identification; difficulty understanding local banking, mortgage, and business systems; and prejudice among employers, local businesses, and citizens.

    NA The organization does not provide financial asset-building services.


  • WDS 9.04

    Supervisors are qualified by a bachelor’s degree, or equivalent training and experience, to provide effective supervision and leadership to direct service personnel.


  • WDS 9.05

    A supervisor is available to provide case consultation at all times services are provided.


  • WDS 9.06

    Employee workloads support the achievement of client outcomes, are regularly reviewed, and are based on an assessment of the following:

    1. the qualifications, competencies, and experience of the worker, including level of supervision needed;
    2. the work and time required to accomplish assigned tasks and job responsibilities; and
    3. service volume.
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