WHO IS ACCREDITED?

Private Organization Accreditation

As one of the largest family services agencies in the country, Child & Family Services has dedicated its resources to meet the needs of the community since 1873.
read more >>

ORGANIZATION TESTIMONIAL

Holy Family Institute

Sister Linda Yankoski, President/CEO

The Council On Accreditation provides all stakeholders involved in the delivery of social services the assurance that the organization is credible, effective, and is committed to quality improvement. The COA process is an important tool for anyone involved in leading an organization to establish best practices and maintaining and updating these practices over time.
read more>>

Purpose

The organization supports staff and promotes staff competence by providing regular supervision and training on relevant service delivery topics.

FOC
TS 2: Training Content

Personnel throughout the agency are trained to fulfill their job responsibilities.

Update:

  • Added Note - 08/31/17
    New note clarifying applicability of TS 2 to independent contractors. 

Note: Please see Documentation of Training Worksheet - Private, Public, Canadian for additional assistance with this standard.

Note:  TS 1 does not apply to independent contractors. 

Rating Indicators
1
The organization's practices fully meet the standard as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the TS 2 Practice standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement as noted in the ratings for the TS 2 Practice standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement as noted in the ratings for the TS 2 Practice standard; and/or
  • One of the TS 2 Fundamental Practice Standards has been rated 3 or 4.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the TS 2 Practice standards; and/or
  • Two of the TS 2 Fundamental Practice Standards have been rated 3 or 4.

Table of Evidence

Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
    • Table of contents of the organization’s orientation and training curricula
    • Annual training calendar and/or training schedules
    • Training files or database that demonstrate attendance at required trainings
    • Training curricula
    • Interview:
      1. Clinical or program director
      2. Relevant personnel

  • TS 2.01

    New personnel are oriented within the first three months of hire to:

    1. the organization’s mission, philosophy, goals, and services;
    2. the cultural and socioeconomic characteristics of the service population;
    3. the organization’s place within its community;
    4. the organization’s personnel manual;
    5. the organization’s performance and quality improvement system; and
    6. lines of accountability and authority within the organization.
    Rating Indicators
    1
    The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
    2
    Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g., 
    • Occasionally orientation extends beyond the three months; or
    • The curriculum related to one of the elements is not fully developed or lacks depth.
    3
    Practice requires significant improvement; e.g.,
    • The curriculum related to two of the elements is not fully developed or lacks depth; or
    • Training does not address one of the elements at all; or
    • A significant number of staff have not been oriented.
    4
    Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all.

  • FP
    TS 2.02

    All personnel who have regular contact with clients receive training on legal issues, including:

    1. mandatory reporting and the identification of clinical indicators of suspected abuse and neglect, as applicable;
    2. federal and state laws requiring disclosure of confidential information for law enforcement purposes, including compliance with a court order, warrant, or subpoena;
    3. duty to warn, pursuant to relevant professional standards and as required by law;
    4. the agency’s policies and procedures on confidentiality and disclosure of service recipient information, and penalties for violation of these policies and procedures;
    5. the legal rights of service recipients; and
    6. requirements associated with consent decrees, as applicable.

    Interpretation: Personnel should be familiar with federal, state, and local laws and know how to identify, document, and report cases of suspected abuse and neglect.

    Note: Elements a, c, and f do not apply to credit counseling organizations.

    Research Note: Every state has a mandatory reporting process for suspected child abuse and neglect. Details about the mandatory reporting laws in each state can be found on the Child Welfare Information Gateway website, formally known as the National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect.

    Rating Indicators
    1
    The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
    2
    Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g., 
    • The curriculum related to one of the elements is not fully developed or lacks depth; or
    • A few personnel have not been trained, but are scheduled to be trained.
    3
    Practice requires significant improvement; e.g.,
    • The curriculum related to two of the elements is not fully developed or lacks depth; or
    • Training does not address one of the elements at all; or
    • A significant number of staff have not been trained.
    4
    Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all.

  • TS 2.03

    Personnel receive training on the following, as appropriate to their position and job responsibilities: 

    1. proper documentation techniques;
    2. the maintenance and security of records; and
    3. the use of technology and information systems.

    Interpretation: As technology is constantly evolving, it is important to keep personnel up-to-date on any changes or updates made to existing systems and new technologies adopted by the organization. 

    Rating Indicators
    1
    The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
    2
    Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g., 
    • The curriculum related to one of the elements is not fully developed or lacks depth; or
    • A few personnel have not been trained, but are scheduled to be trained.
    3
    Practice requires significant improvement; e.g.,
    • Training does not address one of the elements at all; or
    • A significant number of staff have not been trained.
    4
    Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all.

  • TS 2.04

    Direct service personnel demonstrate competence in, or receive training on, as applicable:

    1. positive engagement with individuals and families receiving services;
    2. the needs of individuals and families in crisis including recognizing and responding to mental health crisis and the special service needs of victims of violence, abuse, or neglect and their family members;
    3. recognizing and responding to signs of suicide risk;
    4. basic health and medical needs of the service population;
    5. procedures for working with foreign language speakers and persons with communication impairments; and
    6. public assistance and government subsidies.

    Interpretation: Regarding element (b), staff members understand their responsibility to assess the need for protective services and make recommendations or referrals, as appropriate to the services provided.

    Interpretation: Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) is one way to prepare staff to recognize, understand, and respond to service recipients and colleagues experiencing a mental health crisis. Similarly, "gatekeeper training" programs prepare staff to recognize, interpret, and respond to signs of suicide risk.

    Research Note: Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) is an evidence-based public education program that educates individuals on the warning signs of mental health and/or substance use disorders. The holistic training is intended for a variety of audiences, including homeless shelter workers, school administrators and educators, social workers, and substance abuse and mental health professionals. Program participants learn how to aid individuals in crisis, assess for suicide risk, and connect them with appropriate professional, peer, social, and self-help resources. Preliminary studies show that MHFA builds mental health literacy, reduces stigma, and empowers individuals to help others.

    Research Note: “Gatekeeper training” programs include several evidence-based education programs that train individuals to identify those at risk for suicide, assess level of risk, and make appropriate referrals. These training programs can be specific to a setting such as schools, the broader community, or the military. A wide variety of stakeholders can benefit from participation, for example educators, clergy, social workers, counselors, mental health clinicians, first responders, hospital staff, and military service members. Studies show that gatekeeper training programs can increase participant knowledge about suicide, improve attitudes and beliefs about suicide prevention, and reduce reluctance to intervene with an at-risk individual.

    Rating Indicators
    1
    The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
    2
    Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g., 
    • The curriculum related to one of the elements is not fully developed or lacks depth; or
    • A few personnel have not been trained, but are scheduled to be trained.
    3
    Practice requires significant improvement; e.g.,
    • The curriculum related to two of the elements is not fully developed or lacks depth; or
    • Training does not address one of the elements at all; or
    • A significant number of staff have not been trained.
    4
    Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all.

  • TS 2.05

    Training for direct service personnel addresses differences within the organization’s service population, including:

    1. interventions that address cultural and socioeconomic factors in service delivery;
    2. the role cultural identity plays in motivating human behavior; and
    3. understanding bias or discrimination.

    Interpretation: Credit counseling organizations should implement cultural competence training that demonstrates the importance of sensitivity to matters as outlined in the elements the standard. This intent of the training is to help staff understand and be sensitive to how people of varying cultures think about and handle financial situations. 

    Rating Indicators
    1
    The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
    2
    Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g., 
    • The curriculum related to one of the elements is not fully developed or lacks depth; or
    • A few personnel have not been trained, but are scheduled to be trained.
    3
    Practice requires significant improvement; e.g.,
    • The curriculum related to two of the elements is not fully developed or lacks depth; or
    • Training does not address one of the elements at all; or
    • A significant number of staff have not been trained.
    4
    Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all.

  • TS 2.06

    Direct personnel demonstrate competence in, or receive training on, the needs of special populations within the defined service population, such as the need for normalizing experiences and social inclusion.

    Interpretation: “Special populations” include, but are not limited to, those who are abused and neglected, those with a developmental disability, and those with mental health and substance use disorders. Depending on the services provided and the population served, the organization’s training may vary from different treatment approaches, to procedures for referring individuals to other providers when those needs cannot be addressed by the organization.

    For example, staff at a credit counseling agency may encounter individuals with substance abuse or mental health disorders or individuals who may be at risk for suicide. In such situations, staff should be aware of the agency’s protocols and how to refer those individuals to appropriate services.

    Rating Indicators
    1
    The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
    2
    Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g., 
    • The curriculum is not fully developed or lacks depth; or
    • A few personnel have not been trained, but are scheduled to be trained.
    3
    Practice requires significant improvement; e.g.,
    • The curriculum is insufficient to ensure competence; or
    • A significant number of staff have not been trained.
    4
    Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all.

  • TS 2.07

    Direct service personnel demonstrate competence in, or receive training on, advocacy, including how to:

    1. access financial and other community resources;
    2. identify the impact of the socioeconomic environment on the service population; and
    3. empower service recipients and their families to advocate on their own behalf.

    Interpretation: Community resources can include personal advocates. Training and supervision define conditions under which a personal advocate is needed.

    Interpretation: Although credit counseling organizations primarily provide financial education and counseling services, supporting the success and well-being of clients can be furthered by providing information on how to access resources in the community, strengthening the client’s ability to do so, and understanding the obstacles that may affect the service population.

    Rating Indicators
    1
    The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
    2
    Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g., 
    • The curriculum related to one of the elements is not fully developed or lacks depth; or
    • A few personnel have not been trained, but are scheduled to be trained.
    3
    Practice requires significant improvement; e.g.,
    • Training does not address one of the elements at all; or
    • A significant number of staff have not been trained.
    4
    Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all.

  • TS 2.08

    Direct service personnel who administer clinical diagnostic tests used to establish treatment goals are appropriately trained according to testing protocols.

    Interpretation: This standard refers to sophisticated clinical testing (for example, Stanford-Binet or other intelligence scales) that is appropriately conducted by personnel with advanced clinical credentials and specialized training. It is not applicable to the basic assessment tests that profile or describe client functioning, which can be administered by parents or teachers. Additionally, the standard does not apply to outcome measurement instruments.

    NA Direct service personnel do not administer clinical diagnostic tests.

    Rating Indicators
    1
    The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
    2
    Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g., 
    • The curriculum is not fully developed or lacks depth; or
    • A few personnel have not been trained, but are scheduled to be trained.
    3
    Practice requires significant improvement; e.g.,
    • The curriculum is insufficient to ensure competence; or
    • A significant number of staff have not been trained.
    4
    Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all.

  • FP
    TS 2.09

    Residential services, shelter services, day services, opioid treatment services, and youth development services ensure that there is at least one person certified in basic first aid and CPR on duty at each program site, at any time the program is in operation.

    Interpretation: First Aid and CPR certification programs may include components that are conducted online, but must also include a hands-on, skills-based assessment with a certified instructor. Training and/or certification should be appropriate to the age of the population being served. For example, an organization providing youth development services should ensure that someone on site is certified in administering CPR to children and youth.

    Note: The related standards identified above include CPR and First Aid certification requirements that may be more stringent than the requirements outlined in TS 2.09. Organizations seeking accreditation for any of the identified services must meet requirements outlined in the service standards for all applicable programs.

    NA The organization does not provide residential, shelter, day program, early childhood education, opioid treatment, or youth development services.

    Rating Indicators
    1
    The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
    2
    Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g., 
    • A sufficient number of staff are trained in both first aid and CPR to maintain coverage, however in rare instances gaps in coverage were reported.
    3
    Practice requires significant improvement; e.g.,
    • Insufficient staff have been trained to maintain coverage at all times.
    4
    Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all.
Copyright © 2017 Council on Accreditation. All Rights Reserved.  Privacy Policy and Terms of Use