WHO IS ACCREDITED?

Private Organization Accreditation

White's Residential & Family Services is Indiana's largest social services agency offering accredited and comprehensive residential, foster care, independent living, adoption, and home-based services.
read more >>

ORGANIZATION TESTIMONIAL

Children's Foundation of Mid America

James W. Thurman, President/CEO

Children’s Foundation of Mid America has been accredited through COA since 1983. The process of accreditation ensures that we meet or exceed the highest standards in the industry.
read more>>

Purpose

Comprehensive, systematic, and effective risk prevention and management practices reduce the organization’s risk, loss, and liability exposure.

RPM 5: Technology and Information Management

The organization’s technology and information systems have sufficient capability to support its operations, planning, and evaluation.

Interpretation: The standards in this section address the management of all types of paper and electronic information maintained by the organization, including:

  1. case records and other information of persons served;
  2. administrative, financial, and risk management records and reports;
  3. personnel files and other human resources records; and
  4. performance and quality improvement data and reports.
Interpretation: Implementing a controlled document system is one way an organization can organize, track, store and ensure the use of the most current version of documents.  These systems address, for example, processes for:
  1. updating, creating, and deleting documents;
  2. notification of changes;
  3. identifying documents, i.e., control numbers; and
  4. maintaining a master list of documents.
 
Rating Indicators
1
The organization's practices fully meet the standard, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the RPM 5 Practice standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the RPM 5 Practice standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the RPM 5 Practice standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the RPM 5 Practice standards. 

Table of Evidence

Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
    • Technology and information management plan or relevant sections of the strategic plan that address technology planning
    • Information management procedures/guidelines
    • Agreements with third parties (e.g., information technology vendors, business associates, etc.), when applicable 
    • Interview:
      1. Finance personnel
      2. PQI personnel
      3. Information Systems manager
    • Information Systems observation

  • RPM 5.01

    The organization develops a written technology and information management plan to support its current and future operations which includes:

    1. an explanation of how technology will aid in accomplishing the overall mission of the organization;
    2. an overview and needs assessment of current technology and information systems in use by the organization;
    3. short- and long-term goals for utilizing technology;
    4. an assessment of current technical skills of staff and a plan for additional staff training, as necessary; and
    5. criteria for meeting technology goals, including action items, titles of responsible parties, timelines, benchmarks, budgets and other required resources; and
    6. a framework for regularly evaluating implementation of the plan. 

    Interpretation: The technology and information management plan should be developed to align with the organization’s strategic or long term plan.

    Interpretation: An assessment of current technical skills of staff and a plan for additional staff training can be conducted as part of human resources planning outlined in HR 2 and the annual assessment of training outlined in TS 1.03. Training on technology and information systems is addressed in TS 2.03.

    Research Note: The success and effectiveness of a technology plan is measured by how well an organization adopts and integrates new systems and technologies. While technical skill and ability are critical factors, staff attitudes and willingness to accept new technologies, processes, and procedures are also critical. 

    Technology readiness assessments, strategic communication regarding the technology plan, and piloting or gradually implementing new technologies have all been shown to increase buy-in and the likelihood of positive outcomes in the area of technology use for organizations.

    Rating Indicators
    1
    The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
    2
    Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g.,
    • Some aspects of the plan need further development.
    3
    Practice requires significant improvement; e.g.,
    • The plan is very basic and provides minimal guidance to staff; or
    • Is still under development and has not been fully implemented.
    4
    Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all; e.g.,
    • There  is no documentation of a written IT plan.

  • RPM 5.02

    Personnel have consistent, timely, and appropriate access to electronic and paper records. 

    Interpretation: Organizations moving to electronic systems may need to develop procedures for maintaining both electronic and paper records, including procedures for maintaining consistency between the two file types and ensuring the electronic record is comprehensive and complete. If there are components of paper records that cannot be accommodated electronically, the organization should consider how it will retain and document the existence of supplemental paper-based portions of records.

    Interpretation: Transitioning from a paper-based to an electronic records management system can be a time-consuming and cumbersome process. Organizations that hire third parties to manage this process should have appropriate safeguards and agreements (e.g., business associate agreements, qualified service organization agreement, etc.) in place in order to protect confidentiality.

    Rating Indicators
    1
    The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
    2
    Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g., 
    • A formal system is in place, but is not fully implemented so locating records may sometimes be time consuming or difficult.
    3
    Practice requires significant improvement; e.g.,
    • The system is informal and unsystematic; or
    • Records are occasionally misplaced.
    4
    Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all.

  • RPM 5.03

    The organization has electronic information systems appropriate to its size and complexity, that permit:

    1. timely access to information about persons served by any part of the organization, or by other practitioners within the organization, to support continuity and integration of care across settings and services;
    2. capturing, tracking, and reporting of financial, compliance, and other business information;
    3. longitudinal reporting and comparison of performance over time; and
    4. the use of clear and consistent formats and methods for reporting and disseminating data.

    Interpretation: “Electronic information systems” are used for collecting, storing, analyzing, and disseminating information electronically. An electronic information system may consist of a single desktop or larger network of computers, laptops, and/or devices. Organizations are not required to implement robust electronic information systems; rather they must have systems that are appropriate for supporting their administrative operations and service delivery. 

    Rating Indicators
    1
    The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
    2
    Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g., 
    • Some aspects of the system need further development.
    3
    Practice requires significant improvement; e.g.,
    • The system is basic and minimally supports the organizations data needs; or
    • The system is still under development and has not been fully implemented.
    4
    Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all.
Copyright © 2018 Council on Accreditation. All Rights Reserved.  Privacy Policy and Terms of Use