WHO IS ACCREDITED?

Private Organization Accreditation

Sweetser, a Maine non-profit agency operating since 1828, provides comprehensive mental and behavioral health and substance abuse treatment services. Statewide, it serves around 15,000 consumers a year, including children, adults, and families in outpatient, office-based, and residential settings.
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VOLUNTEER TESTIMONIAL

Mike Angstadt

Volunteer Roles: Commissioner; Hague Evaluator; Lead Evaluator; Peer Reviewer; Team Leader

Serving as a Team Leader for COA has been an enriching experience in many ways. Utilizing the Contextual Accreditation process to discern the means in which agencies, offering a variety of services, located throughout the US, Canada ,the Philippines and other countries provide best and most promising practices to their consumers has been particularly rewarding. read more>>

Purpose

Adults with serious and persistent mental illness who participate in Psychiatric Rehabilitation Services achieve their highest level of self-sufficiency and recovery through gains in personal empowerment, hopefulness, and competency.

PSR 9: Personnel

Personnel providing psychosocial or psychiatric rehabilitation are supervised by qualified professionals and receive training on an on-going basis.

Rating Indicators
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g., 
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised.
    • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to staff without the listed qualifications.
    • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them.
  • With some exceptions staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth.
    • A few personnel have not yet received required training.
    • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions.
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
    • Supervisors provide structure and support in relation to service outcomes, organizational culture and staff retention.
  • With a few exceptions caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards.
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services, and are adjusted as necessary in accord with established workload procedures.
    • Procedures need strengthening.
    • With few exceptions procedures are understood by staff and are being used.
  • With a few exceptions specialized staff are retained as required and possess the required qualifications.
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • One of the Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.
  • A significant number of staff, e.g., direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers, do not possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result the integrity of the service may be compromised.
    • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur.
    • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications.
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training documentation is poorly maintained.
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements.
  • Workloads are excessive and the integrity of the service may be compromised. 
    • Procedures need significant strengthening; or
    • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,

?For example:
  • Two or more Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.

Table of Evidence

Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
    • Program staffing chart that includes lines of supervision
    • List of program personnel that includes:
      1. name;
      2. title;
      3. degree held and/or other credentials;
      4. FTE or volunteer;
      5. length of service at the organization;
      6. time in current position
    • Table of contents of training curricula
    • Procedures and criteria used for assigning and evaluating workloads
    • Documentation of training
    • Job descriptions
    • Training curricula
    • Documentation of workload assessment
    • Interview:
      1. Supervisors
      2. Relevant personnel
    • Review personnel files

  • FP
    PSR 9.01

    Supervisors are qualified by one or more of the following:

    1. an advanced degree in social work;
    2. an advanced degree from a program in psychosocial rehabilitation or rehabilitation counseling;
    3. an advanced degree in a comparable human service field, with supervised post-graduate experience in providing case management and other services to persons with serious and persistent mental illness;
    4. substantial experience in the psychosocial rehabilitation field which, based on the organization’s decision, substitutes for specific educational requirements; and/or
    5. national or state certification, licensing, or registration requirements in the psychosocial or psychiatric rehabilitation field.

  • PSR 9.02

    Direct service personnel are qualified by:

    1. a bachelor’s degree in a health-related field;
    2. an associate’s degree in a health-related field and minimum 1 year of experience;
    3. 30 hours, or their equivalent, of college credit twoard a bachelor’s degree in a health-related field and 1 year of experience; or
    4. 2 years of work experience in a supervised mental health setting.

    Update:

    • Added Standard - 02/07/18

  • FP
    PSR 9.03

    Direct service personnel demonstrate experience or receive training and/or education in:

    1. psychosocial rehabilitation;
    2. substance use conditions;
    3. partnering and engaging with families;
    4. accessing culturally-relevant community services and resources;
    5. recognizing trauma and coping mechanisms, and providing trauma-informed care;
    6. special populations, including individuals who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or gender non-conforming;
    7. vocational issues;
    8. crisis intervention;
    9. the use, management, and side effects of psychotropic medications;
    10. the characteristics and treatment of mental illness; and
    11. recognizing the early signs of decompensation and risk factors that increase vulnerability to relapse.

    Research Note: Experience, training, and education regarding psychiatric rehabilitation services should address evidence based practices, recovery, the psychiatric rehabilitation process, the consumer movement, and cultural issues.


  • PSR 9.04

    Direct service personnel workloads support the achievement of client outcomes, are regularly reviewed, and are based on an assessment of the following:

    1. the qualifications, competencies, and experience of the worker, including the level of supervision needed;
    2. the work and time required to accomplish assigned tasks and job responsibilities; and
    3. service volume, accounting for assessed level of needs of new and current clients and referrals.
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