WHO IS ACCREDITED?

Private Organization Accreditation

Consumer Credit Counseling Service of the Savannah Area's mission is to provide the best non-profit community service, dedicated to delivering professional and confidential counseling, debt management, housing counseling and consumer education to all segments of the community regardless of ability to pay.
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VOLUNTEER TESTIMONIAL

Nicole Deprez-Garrity, M.Ed.

Volunteer Roles: Endorser, Lead Endorser

Nicole Deprez-Garrity is a lead After School Endorser based in Germany.
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Purpose

Adults with serious and persistent mental illness who participate in Psychiatric Rehabilitation Services achieve their highest level of self-sufficiency and recovery through gains in personal empowerment, hopefulness, and competency.

PSR 4: Service Philosophy, Modalities, and Interventions

The service philosophy:

  1. sets forth a logical approach for how program activities and interventions will meet the needs of service recipients;
  2. guides the implementation and development of program activities and services based on the best available evidence of effectiveness; and
  3. outlines the service modalities and interventions that personnel may employ.

Interpretation: A program model or logic model can be a useful tool to help staff think systematically about how the program can make a measureable difference by drawing a clear connection between the service population’s needs, available resources, program activities and interventions, program outputs, and desired outcomes.

Rating Indicators
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,  
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted, however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Written service philosophy needs improvement or clarification; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations (HR 6.02) and training (TS 2.03); or
  • In a few rare instances required consent was not obtained; or
  • Monitoring procedures need minor clarification; or
  • With few exceptions the policy on prohibited interventions is understood by staff, or the written policy needs minor clarification.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • The written service philosophy needs significant improvement; or
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Documentation is inconsistent or in in some instances is missing and no corrective action has not been initiated; or
  • Required consent is often not obtained; or
  • A few personnel who are employing non-traditional or unconventional interventions have not completed training, as required; or
  • There are gaps in monitoring of interventions, as required; or
  • Policy on prohibited interventions does not include at least one of the required elements; or
  • Service philosophy is not clearly related to expressed mission or programs of the organization; or
  • One of the Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,
  • There is no written service philosophy; or
  • There are no written policy or procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing; or  
  • Two or more Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.

Table of Evidence

Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
    • Include service philosophy in the Narrative
    • Policies for prohibited interventions
    • Procedures for the use of non-traditional or unconventional practices
    • Table of contents of training curricula
    • Documentation of training
    • Interview:
      1. Clinical or program director
      2. Relevant personnel
      3. Individuals or families served
    • Review case records

  • PSR 4.01

    The program is guided by a philosophy that provides a logical basis for the services and support to be delivered to individuals, based on program goals and the best available evidence of service effectiveness.


  • FP
    PSR 4.02

    If the organization permits the use of service modalities and interventions it defines as non-traditional or unconventional, it:

    1. explains any benefits, risks, side effects, and alternatives to the service recipient or a legal guardian;
    2. obtains the written, informed consent of the individual or his/her legal guardian;
    3. ensures that personnel receive sufficient training, and/or certification when it is available; and
    4. monitors the use and effectiveness of such interventions.

    Interpretation: Examples of non-traditional and unconventional service modalities or interventions include, but are not limited to: hypnosis, acupuncture, and modalities or interventions that involve physical contact, such as massage therapy.

    NA The organization does not permit non-traditional or unconventional modalities or interventions.


  • FP
    PSR 4.03

    Organization policy prohibits:

    1. corporal punishment;
    2. the use of aversive stimuli;
    3. interventions that involve withholding nutrition or hydration, or that inflict physical or psychological pain;
    4. the use of demeaning, shaming, or degrading language or activities;
    5. forced physical exercise to eliminate behaviors;
    6. unwarranted use of invasive procedures or activities as a disciplinary action;
    7. punitive work assignments;
    8. punishment by peers; and
    9. group punishment or discipline for individual behavior.

  • FP
    PSR