WHO IS ACCREDITED?

Private Organization Accreditation

Sweetser, a Maine non-profit agency operating since 1828, provides comprehensive mental and behavioral health and substance abuse treatment services. Statewide, it serves around 15,000 consumers a year, including children, adults, and families in outpatient, office-based, and residential settings.
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ORGANIZATION TESTIMONIAL

The Village for Families & Children, Inc.

Galo A. Rodriguez, M.P.H., President & CEO

COA Peer Reviewers demonstrated their expertise through their knowledge of COA standards as well as experience in the behavioral health field. In addition, COA’s seminars and tools were very helpful in guiding us through the accreditation process.
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PQT 96.38: Training Requirements for social service personnel

Training Requirements for Social Service Personnel

Table of Evidence

Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
  • A narrative describing the agency/person’s method for providing orientation 96.38 (a)
  • Table of contents of orientation curricula for new employees 96.38 (a)
  • A narrative describing the agency/person’s method for providing training 96.38 (b)
  • Table of contents of training curricula for employees 96.38 (b)
  • A narrative describing seminars, conferences, or other internal and external training resources used 96.38 (c)
  • A narrative describing training exemption process 96.38 (d)
  • New employee orientation curricula 96.38 (a)
  • Training files, database, or personnel files that document attendance at required trainings 96.38 (a), 96.38 (b)
  • Training curricula for employees 96.38 (b)
  • Interview
    1. Recently hired employees 96.38 (a)
    2. Person responsible for orientation 96.38 (a)
    3. Person responsible for training 96.38 (b), 96.38 (c), 96.38 (d)
    4. Employees 96.38 (b), 96.38 (d)
  • Review personnel files or other documentation demonstrating attendance at training 96.38 (c)
  • Review personnel files 96.38 (d)

  • C
    PQT 96.38.a

    The agency or person provides newly hired employees who have adoption-related responsibilities involving the application of clinical skills and judgment (home studies, child background studies, counseling services, parent preparation, post-placement and other similar services) with a comprehensive orientation to intercountry adoption that includes training on:

    (1) the requirements of the Convention, the IAA, the UAA, the regulations implementing the IAA or UAA,  and other applicable Federal regulations;

    (2) the INA regulations applicable to the immigration of children described in INA 101(b)(1)(F) and 101(b)(1)(G);

    (3) the adoption laws of any foreign country where the agency or person provides adoption services;

    (4) relevant State laws;

    (5) ethical considerations in intercountry adoption and prohibitions on child-buying;

    (6) the agency’s or person’s goals, ethical and professional guidelines, organizational lines of accountability, policies, and procedures; and

    (7) the cultural diversity of the population(s) served by the agency or person.


  • F
    PQT 96.38.b

    In addition to the orientation training required under paragraph (a) of this section, the agency or person provides initial training to newly hired or current employees whose responsibilities include providing adoption-related social services that involve the application of clinical skills and judgment (home studies, child background studies, counseling services, parent preparation, post-placement and other similar services) that addresses:

    (1) the factors in the countries of origin that lead to children needing adoptive families;

    (2) feelings of separation, grief, and loss experienced by the child with respect to the family of origin;

    (3) attachment and post-traumatic stress disorders;

    (4) psychological issues facing children who have experienced abuse or neglect and/or whose parents’ rights have been terminated because of abuse or neglect;

    (5) the impact of institutionalization on child development;

    (6) outcomes for children placed for adoption internationally and the benefits of permanent family placements over other forms of government care;

    (7) the most frequent medical and psychological problems experienced by children from the countries of origin served by the agency or person;

    (8) the process of developing emotional ties to an adoptive family;

    (9) acculturation and assimilation issues, including those arising from factors such as race, ethnicity, religion, and culture and the impact of having been adopted internationally; and

    (10) child, adolescent, and adult development as affected by adoption.


  • F
    PQT 96.38.c

    The agency or person ensures that employees who provide adoption-related social services that involve the application of clinical skills and judgment (home studies, child background studies, counseling services, parent preparation, post-placement and other similar services) also receive, in addition to the orientation and initial training described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, no less than thirty hours of training every two years, or more if required by State law, on current and emerging adoption practice issues through participation in seminars, conferences, documented distance learning courses, and other similar programs. Continuing education hours required under State law may count toward the thirty hours of training as long as the training is related to current and emerging adoption practice issues.


  • F
    PQT 96.38.d

    The agency or person exempts newly hired and current employees from elements of the orientation and initial training required in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section only where the employee has demonstrated experience with intercountry adoption and knowledge of the Convention, the IAA, and the UAA.

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