WHO IS ACCREDITED?

Private Organization Accreditation

White's Residential & Family Services is Indiana's largest social services agency offering accredited and comprehensive residential, foster care, independent living, adoption, and home-based services.
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VOLUNTEER TESTIMONIAL

Audrey Coleman, RN-MSN

Volunteer Roles: Military Reviewer; Peer Reviewer; Team Leader

My first experience with COA was in 1999 with what was a NC Area Program. I started as a peer reviewer in 2005, doing two to four site visits a year. I am also a team leader and have recently been approved to be a military reviewer.
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Purpose

Outreach Services identify and engage youth, adults, and families experiencing homelessness as a first step to accepting care for immediate health and safety needs, gaining access to community services and resources, taking steps toward community integration, and connecting to safe and stable housing.

OS 7: Personnel

Outreach personnel are trained and qualified to meet the needs of youth, adults, and families experiencing homelessness.

Rating Indicators
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g., 
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised.
    • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to staff without the listed qualifications.
    • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them.
  • With some exceptions staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth.
    • A few personnel have not yet received required training.
    • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions.
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
    • Supervisors provide structure and support in relation to service outcomes, organizational culture and staff retention.
  • With a few exceptions caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards.
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services, and are adjusted as necessary in accord with established workload procedures.
    • Procedures need strengthening.
    • With few exceptions procedures are understood by staff and are being used.
  • With a few exceptions specialized staff are retained as required and possess the required qualifications.
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • One of the Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.
  • A significant number of staff, e.g., direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers, do not possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result the integrity of the service may be compromised.
    • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur.
    • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications.
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training documentation is poorly maintained.
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements.
  • Workloads are excessive and the integrity of the service may be compromised. 
    • Procedures need significant strengthening; or
    • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,

?For example:
  • Two or more Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.

Table of Evidence

Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
    • Program staffing chart that includes lines of supervision
    • List of program personnel that includes:
      1. name;
      2. title;
      3. degree held and/or other credentials;
      4. FTE or volunteer;
      5. length of service at the organization;
      6. time in current position
    • Table of contents of training curricula
    • Procedures and criteria used for assigning and evaluating workloads
    • Job descriptions
    • Documentation of training
    • Training curricula
    • Interview:
      1. Supervisors
      2. Personnel
    • Review personnel files

  • OS 7.01

    Personnel providing outreach services are nonjudgmental and patient, and possess:

    1. the ability to establish and maintain trusting relationships and professional boundaries;
    2. the ability to handle rejection;
    3. sensitivity to the needs of individuals and families in crisis;
    4. the capacity to view all persons positively and recognize their strengths;
    5. respect for service recipients;
    6. the ability to assess need for care;
    7. knowledge of community resources and housing;
    8. cultural and linguistic competence; and
    9. perseverance.

  • OS 7.02

    Training is provided to all outreach workers on the following topics:

    1. the nature of the service population;
    2. methods of engaging and re-engaging youth, adults, and families;
    3. trauma-informed care;
    4. recognizing and responding to signs of suicide risk;
    5. crisis intervention methods;
    6. making linkages and referrals to community and housing services;
    7. identifying medical needs or problems, including the special health needs of the target population; and
    8. the organization’s plans for managing medical or psychiatric emergencies.

    Interpretation: The training components in OS 7.02 should be provided to peer outreach workers as it relates to their job responsibilities.


  • OS 7.03

    Outreach workers receive training and supervision on the special service needs of service recipients, including, as appropriate:

    1. individuals coping with substance abuse and/or mental health issues, including dual diagnosis;
    2. individuals coping with trauma, including how to recognize trauma and appropriate interventions or addressing the acute needs of trauma victims;
    3. individuals with HIV/AIDS;
    4. individuals who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or gender non-conforming;
    5. individuals and families who have been victims of violence, abuse, or neglect;
    6. individuals who may be the victims of humant rafficking or sexual exploitation, including how to identify potential victims;
    7. pregnant and parenting mothers and/or fathers with young children;
    8. runaway and homeless children and youth;
    9. persons with current or past criminal justice system involvement;
    10. persons with current or past child welfare system involvement;
    11. persons with developmental disabilities; and
    12. older adults.

    Interpretation: The training and supervision components in OS 7.03 should be provided to peer outreach workers as it relates to their job responsibilities.


  • OS 7.04

    Outreach workers who have frequent contact with individuals living with mental health and/or substance use conditions have clinical skills and/or are supervised by personnel with such skills.


  • FP
    OS 7.05

    Personnel engaged in street outreach receive training in recognizing and responding to street safety risks and the organization’s safety guidelines.

    NA The organization does not provide street outreach.


  • OS 7.06

    Peer outreach workers receive pre- and in-service training and ongoing supervision and support around:

    1. established ethical guidelines, including setting appropriate boundaries; and
    2. skills, concepts, and philosophies related to peer support.

    Interpretation: Peer outreach workers establish relationships with service recipients that are based on mutual respect and trust and support bidirectional learning and reciprocity. One of the greatest perceived challenges of delivering peer support services is peers’ ability to handle confidentiality and boundaries. Clearly defining and communicating the role of the peer outreach worker is critical when establishing the peer-to-peer relationship.
     

    Research Note: Peer support is built on shared personal experience and empathy, and focuses on an individual’s strengths, not weaknesses. Information provided by peers is often seen as more authentic as peers have similar lived experience and can better relate to those they support.

    NA The organization does not utilize peer outreach workers.


  • OS 7.07

    Supervisors of outreach workers are qualified by:

    1. an advanced degree in social work or a comparable human service field and at least two years’ direct care experience in human services; or
    2. a bachelor’s degree in social work or a comparable human service field and at least four years direct care experience in human services. 

  • OS 7.08

    Caseloads are regularly reviewed, and are based on an assessment of the following:

    1. the qualifications, competencies, and experience of the worker, including the level of supervision needed;
    2. the work and time required to accomplish assigned tasks and job responsibilities; and
    3. service volume, accounting for assessed level of needs of new and current clients and referrals.
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