WHO IS ACCREDITED?

Private Organization Accreditation

CSS Healthcare Services provides Community based health services to the young, the elderly and to Individuals with Developmental Disability. Founded in 1997, we have the ability to offer a variety of quality community-based services to our clients, which has greatly contributed to our growth and success.
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VOLUNTEER TESTIMONIAL

Judy Kay, LCSW

Volunteer Roles: Peer Reviewer; Team Leader

In administration for 22 of 24 years at Child Saving Institute, a COA-accredited not-for-profit child welfare agency in Omaha, Nebraska. Retired approximately two years ago, I moved to Tucson, Arizona, where I advocate for children's rights as a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) volunteer to three young children.
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Purpose

Customers who participate in Financial Readiness Programs gain personal financial management skills, learn strategies to prevent and resolve financial problems, and identify short and long-term actions to achieve financial goals and ensure personal, family, and mission readiness.

Definition

The foundation of DoD’s financial readiness programs are the four pillars of financial readiness, which include managing money, saving then investing, consumer protection, and planning for the future. As such, Financial Readiness Programs (MIL-FR) provide financial education, training, counseling, and information and referral services to assist customers with evaluating income and expenditures, budgeting, reducing debt, planning for retirement, accessing military benefit programs, and saving and investing for the future. Information addresses the effects of financial decisions on personal and professional lives, resources needed for prudent consumer decisions, and related services and supports.

Update:

  • Revised Standard - 08/09/17
    The MIL-FR standards were revised in August 2017 to reflect current practice. 

Research Note: Research indicates that participation in financial education results in improved financial knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Examples of behavior changes include reviewing investment goals, developing an investment plan, creating a spending plan, establishing an emergency fund, reducing credit card debt, and increasing contributions to a retirement plan.

Note: The MIL-FR standards were revised in August 2017 to reflect current practice. For more information please refer to the MIL-FR Update Summary

Note: Please see MIL-FR Reference List for a list of resources that informed the development of these standards.

Financial Readiness Programs Narrative

Self-Study Evidence
    • If elements of the standards (e.g. housing and homeownership education) are implemented through participation in a formal, coordinated service delivery system, provide a list that identifies the providers (e.g. housing office) and the service components for which they are responsible.
    • Provide any information you would like the Peer Review Team to know about the MFR program’s financial readiness programs.
    • As applicable, a list of activities or classes including, for each activity or class:
      1. the type of activity/class;
      2. whether the activity/class is short-term or ongoing;
      3. how often the activity/class is offered;
      4. the average number of participants per session of the activityclass, in the last month; and
      5. the total number of participants in the activity/class, in the last month
    • A list of any programs that were opened, merged with other programs or services, or closed
    • A list or description of MIL-FR outcomes and outputs being measured
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