WHO IS ACCREDITED?

Private Organization Accreditation

Germaine Lawrence is a residential treatment center for girls ages 12-18 with complex behavioral, psychological and learning challenges.   Girls live at our programs while receiving special education, individual, family and group therapy; psychiatric and primary medical care; and a wide variety of therapeutic activities and interventions.
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ORGANIZATION TESTIMONIAL

The Village for Families & Children, Inc.

Galo A. Rodriguez, M.P.H., President & CEO

COA Peer Reviewers demonstrated their expertise through their knowledge of COA standards as well as experience in the behavioral health field. In addition, COA’s seminars and tools were very helpful in guiding us through the accreditation process.
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Purpose

Through sound administration and effective management, the MFR program achieves its vision, mission and strategic goals; assures appropriate use of resources for the good of customers; and remains responsive to the needs of the military community.

MIL-AM 4: Community Capacity Building

The MFR program partners with a diverse group of military and civilian stakeholders to plan and carry out community capacity building initiatives that improve military family readiness.

Note: MFR programs or Reserve component MFR program locations that are not responsible for leading efforts to engage stakeholders in community capacity building efforts will only be reviewed under MIL-AM 4.07.

Rating Indicators
1
Full Implementation, Outstanding Performance
A rating of (1) indicates that the programs’ practices fully meet the standard and reflect a high level of capacity.  All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, with rare or no exceptions; exceptions do not impact service quality or overall performance.  
2
Substantial Implementation, Good Performance 
A rating of (2) indicates that a programs’ infrastructure and practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement. The majority of the standards requirements have been met and the basic framework required by the standard has been implemented.  Minor inconsistencies and practices that are not fully developed are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality or overall performance.
3
Partial Implementation, Concerning Performance
A rating of (3) indicates that significant aspects of the programs’ observed infrastructure and/or practices require significant improvement. The program has not implemented the basic framework of the standard but instead has in place only part(s) of this framework. Omissions or exceptions to the practices outlined in the standard occur regularly, or practices are implemented in a cursory or haphazard manner.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised. Capacity is at a basic level.
4
Unsatisfactory Implementation and Performance
A rating of (4) indicates that implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all. The programs’ observed administration and management infrastructure and practices are weak or non-existent; or show signs of neglect, stagnation, or deterioration.

Please see Rating Guidance for additional rating examples. 

Table of Evidence

Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
    • List of stakeholders (MIL-AM 4.01)
    • Procedures for communicating and collaborating with stakeholders (MIL-AM 4.02)
    • Assessment procedures (MIL-AM 4.03)
    • Assessment tool and/or criteria included in assessments (MIL-AM 4.03)
    • Planning procedures (MIL-AM 4.04)
    • Procedures for monitoring and reevaluating the plan(s) (MIL-AM 4.05)
    • Description of how the MFR program or each of the Reserve component MFR program’s locations contribute to coordinated community capacity building initiatives in their area of responsibility (MIL-AM 4.07)
    • Copies of outreach and informational materials provided to various stakeholder groups and the community, if applicable (MIL-AM 4.01, MIL-AM 4.06)
    • Evidence of collaboration with stakeholders, if applicable (i.e. meeting notices, meeting agendas, meeting minutes, correspondence, documentation of decisions) (MIL-AM 4.02, MIL-AM 4.03, MIL-AM 4.04)
    • Copy of community assessment(s), if applicable (MIL-AM 4.03)
    • Copy of plan(s), if applicable (MIL-AM 4.04)
    • Copy of revised plan(s) with revisions highlighted, if applicable (MIL-AM 4.05)
    • Evidence of participation in coordinated community capacity building initiatives, if applicable (e.g. meeting agenda, meeting notes, meeting minutes, correspondence, documentation of decisions, etc.) (MIL-AM 4.07)
    • Interview:
      1. MFR program director
      2. Relevant staff
      3. Community stakeholders

  • MIL-AM 4.01

    The MFR program engages a diverse group of military and civilian stakeholders that represent many segments of the community on an ongoing basis.

    Interpretation: Examples of stakeholder groups include military and civilian leaders, service providers, institutions, and residents including Service members and their families. 

    Research Note: Some literature suggests that engaging a diverse array of community stakeholders helps to promote the long-term effectiveness of a community capacity building initiative and the sustainability of positive results. Involving a diverse group of programs and individuals brings a wider range of talents, resources, and connections, and can help to legitimize the initiative and its work.

    NA The MFR program, or all of the Reserve component MFR program locations, is not responsible for leading efforts to engage stakeholders in community capacity building efforts.


  • MIL-AM 4.02

    The MFR program’s procedures for communicating and collaborating with its stakeholders include:

    1. establishing a shared purpose and goals for partnership;
    2. setting clear guidelines for participation including defined roles, resource expectations, rules of engagement, and dispute resolution;
    3. identifying and addressing the needs of participating stakeholders, including training resources;
    4. following fair and clearly-understood procedures for decision-making and documenting all important decisions in writing; and
    5. developing clear mechanisms for frequent, ongoing, two-way communication.

    Interpretation: Examples of strategies and techniques the MFR program may use to facilitate communication with stakeholders include community meetings and public forums, newsletters, news releases, and special events.

    NA The MFR program, or all of the Reserve component MFR program locations, is not responsible for leading efforts to engage stakeholders in community capacity building efforts.


  • MIL-AM 4.03

    The MFR program and its stakeholders conduct periodic assessments of community need and existing resources to identify and analyze: 

    1. demographics and characteristics of Service members and their families;
    2. the community’s protective factors including the assets, skills, capacities, and resources of its residents, programs, and institutions;
    3. the needs, issues, and concerns of Service members and their families; and
    4. the community’s current readiness to take on a particular initiative including, among other things, the community’s existing motivation to act on a particular issue.
    Interpretation: The frequency of community assessments may be defined by DoD or Service regulations or policies.

    Interpretation: Examples of community characteristics include population statistics, age, marital status, household size, racial and ethnic background, language spoken, educational levels, employment rates, income, and health statistics.
     
    Examples of strategies that may be used to gather assessment information include surveys; one-on-one interviews; focus groups; reviews of existing demographic information, research, and literature; visits to community centers and other gathering places; media analysis; and utilizing the results of assessments already conducted by third parties.

    Research Note: Literature emphasizes that all communities have considerable assets on which they can build, and that communities will not be strengthened and improved if community capacity building initiatives focus only on their needs, problems and deficits.

    NA The MFR program, or all of the Reserve component MFR program locations, is not responsible for leading efforts to engage stakeholders in community capacity building efforts.


  • MIL-AM 4.04

    The MFR program actively involves stakeholders in developing an assessment-based, results-oriented plan for community change that is respectful of diversity and difference and includes:
    1. priorities or areas of focus; 
    2. measurable goals, desired outcomes, and methods for tracking and evaluating progress; 
    3. strategies for achieving goals and desired outcomes including responsible parties and applicable timeframes; and
    4. strategies for promoting the long-term sustainability of the initiative and its achievements.

    Research Note: Community building initiatives do not typically follow a linear path; rather, planning and action can occur simultaneously and interactively throughout the course of an initiative. Accordingly, although strategic planning is an essential part of the improvement process, some literature emphasizes that initial planning need not be exhaustive. Instead of striving to develop an all-encompassing plan before taking any action, launching some tangible activities with visible benefits early in the initiative may help to build momentum, keep stakeholders motivated, and increase the likelihood of success. 
     
    Research Note: One planning model for community capacity building initiatives is called Results Focused Planning, which starts by reframing an identified community deficit or need as a positive result for Service members and their families. Once the desired result(s) have been identified, an action plan can be developed, executed, and monitored to support achievement of the chosen outcome(s).

    NA The MFR program, or all of the Reserve component MFR program locations, is not responsible for leading efforts to engage stakeholders in community capacity building efforts.


  • MIL-AM 4.05

    A process is in place for periodically reevaluating the implementation and ongoing appropriateness of the established plan that includes: 

    1. a data-driven evaluation of progress towards measurable goals including identifying areas of success and areas in need of additional effort; 
    2. evaluating whether the priorities and goals included in the plan are still applicable and appropriate; and
    3. making any adjustments or modifications needed to achieve goals and sustain progress.

    Note: For more information about collecting and analyzing data and measuring progress (a), please see MIL-AM 5.

    NA The MFR program, or all of the Reserve component MFR program locations, is not responsible for leading efforts to engage stakeholders in community capacity building efforts.


  • MIL-AM 4.06

    The MFR program promotes ongoing engagement of internal and external stakeholders and the community by:

    1. publicizing results; and
    2. celebrating achievements.

    NA The MFR program, or all of the Reserve component MFR program locations, is not responsible for leading efforts to engage stakeholders in community capacity building efforts.
     


  • MIL-AM 4.07

    The MFR program is an active participant in a coordinated effort to strengthen the community’s capacity to support military family readiness that includes:

    1. ongoing collaboration and information sharing;
    2. shared decision-making;
    3. assessment-based planning to implement initiatives that meet an existing military family need within the community; and
    4. ongoing monitoring and sustainment activities to ensure achievement and sustainability of desired goals. 

    Interpretation: Standard implementation may be demonstrated by membership on a community capacity building task force, or similar initiative, by which the MFR program ensures that military families are fully represented as a constituent group.

    NA The MFR program, or all of the Reserve component MFR program location,s are responsible for leading efforts to engage stakeholders in community capacity building efforts.

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