WHO IS ACCREDITED?

Private Organization Accreditation

Children's Home Society of Florida delivers a unique spectrum of social services designed to protect children at risk of abuse, neglect or abandonment; to strengthen and stabilize families; to help young people break the cycle of abuse and neglect; and to find safe, loving homes for children.
read more >>

VOLUNTEER TESTIMONIAL

Ulysses Arteaga, L.C.S.W.

Volunteer Roles: Commissioner; EPPA; Marine Reviewer; Military Reviewer; Peer Reviewer; Team Leader

The Consuelo Foundation 2012 Peer Reviewer of the Year, Mr. Arteaga conducts two to three site visits a year, often volunteering for visits that require a Spanish speaking peer.
read more>>

Purpose

Juvenile Justice Residential Services promote public safety by providing youth with a supportive, structured setting that helps them address their needs and develop the attitudes and skills needed to make responsible choices, avoid negative behaviors, and become productive, connected, and law-abiding citizens.

JJR 18: Personnel

Personnel have the training, skills, and experience needed to help youth overcome problems and become productive, connected, and law-abiding citizens.

Note: Staffing ratios are addressed in JJR 14.

Rating Indicators
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g., 
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised.
    • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to staff without the listed qualifications.
    • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them.
  • With some exceptions staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth.
    • A few personnel have not yet received required training.
    • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions.
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
    • Supervisors provide structure and support in relation to service outcomes, organizational culture and staff retention.
  • With a few exceptions caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards.
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services, and are adjusted as necessary in accord with established workload procedures.
    • Procedures need strengthening.
    • With few exceptions procedures are understood by staff and are being used.
  • With a few exceptions specialized staff are retained as required and possess the required qualifications.
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • One of the Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.
  • A significant number of staff, e.g., direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers, do not possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result the integrity of the service may be compromised.
    • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur.
    • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications.
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training documentation is poorly maintained.
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements.
  • Workloads are excessive and the integrity of the service may be compromised. 
    • Procedures need significant strengthening; or
    • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,

?For example:
  • Two or more Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.

Table of Evidence

Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
    • Program staffing chart that includes lines of supervision
    • Table of contents of training curricula
    • Procedures and criteria used to assign and evaluate workloads
    • List of program personnel that includes:
      1. name;
      2. title;
      3. degree held and/or other credentials;
      4. FTE or volunteer;
      5. length of service at the organization;
      6. time in current position
    • Documentation of training
    • Training curricula
    • Job descriptions
    • Documentation of workload assessment
    • Interview:
      1. Supervisors
      2. Personnel
    • Review personnel files
    • Verify employment of or contract with professionals providing specialized services

  • JJR 18.01

    Personnel receive the appropriate amount of training and support to demostrate competency:

    1. youth development;
    2. positive youth engagement including communicating respectfully, establishing rapport, and building trust with youth;
    3. youths’ rights and responsibilities;
    4. assessing risks and safety;
    5. recognizing and responding to needs, including needs related to health, mental health, trauma and substance use;
    6. suicide prevention and response;
    7. conflict management, crisis intervention, and de-escalation techniques;
    8. behavior management and positive disciplinary techniques;
    9. culturally competent service delivery that considers gender and gender identity, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, developmental level, disability, and other relevant characteristics;
    10. understanding the importance of rehabilitation and reintegration;
    11. the definitions of human trafficking (both labor and sex trafficking) and sexual exploitation, and identifying potential victims;
    12. protocols for responding to service recipients who run away; and
    13. collaborating with other providers and local law enforcement.

    Interpretation: Competence can be demonstrated through a combination of education, training, and experience.


  • JJR 18.02

    Personnel providing youth care and supervision are qualified by at least:

    1. two years of college in a social or human service field; or
    2. a high school degree or equivalent and at least two years’ experience working with youth.

  • JJR 18.03

    Case managers are qualified by:

    1. an advanced degree in a social or human service field; or
    2. a bachelor’s degree in a social or human service field and experience working with youth.

  • JJR 18.04

    Qualified professionals and specialists provide needed services related to:

    1. mental health;
    2. substance use;
    3. medicine and dentistry;
    4. nursing; and
    5. education.

  • JJR 18.05

    A team approach is used to ensure a comprehensive, integrated approach to service delivery and supervision.

    Interpretation: While JJR 5 addresses coordination with personnel at other organizations and agencies, this standard is intended to encourage appropriate communication and coordination among the organization’s personnel.


  • JJR 18.06

    Employee workloads support the achievement of positive outcomes for youth, are regularly reviewed, and are based on an assessment of the following:

    1. the qualifications, competencies, and experience of personnel, including the level of supervision needed;
    2. case complexity and status, including the intensity of youths’ risks and needs;
    3. the work and time required to accomplish assigned tasks, including those associated with individual caseloads and other job responsibilities;
    4. whether services are provided by multiple professionals or team members; and
    5. service volume.

  • JJR 18.07

    Supervisors are qualified by:

    1. an advanced degree in a social or human service field; or
    2. a bachelor’s degree in a social or human service field and at least two years’ experience working with youth.
Copyright © 2018 Council on Accreditation. All Rights Reserved.  Privacy Policy and Terms of Use