WHO IS ACCREDITED?

Private Organization Accreditation

One Hope United offers a range of services aimed at our mission of "Protecting children and strengthening families" including early childhood education, early intervention and prevention, family preservation, foster care, residential, and adoption.
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VOLUNTEER TESTIMONIAL

Jane Bonk, Ph.D., LCSW

Volunteer Roles: Commissioner; Evaluator; Lead Evaluator; Peer Reviewer; Team Leader

Dr. Jane Bonk is a team leader, evaluator, and commissioner who has led over 25 site visits for COA.
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Purpose

Immigrants receive timely and appropriate support and assistance in accessing legal information, advice, lawful permanent residency, citizenship, and/or other forms of immigration relief.

ILS 6: Personnel

Personnel and volunteers provide immigration legal services under the supervision of trained professionals.

Rating Indicators
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g., 
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised.
    • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to staff without the listed qualifications.
    • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them.
  • With some exceptions staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth.
    • A few personnel have not yet received required training.
    • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions.
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
    • Supervisors provide structure and support in relation to service outcomes, organizational culture and staff retention.
  • With a few exceptions caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards.
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services, and are adjusted as necessary in accord with established workload procedures.
    • Procedures need strengthening.
    • With few exceptions procedures are understood by staff and are being used.
  • With a few exceptions specialized staff are retained as required and possess the required qualifications.
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • One of the Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.
  • A significant number of staff, e.g., direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers, do not possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result the integrity of the service may be compromised.
    • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur.
    • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications.
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training documentation is poorly maintained.
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements.
  • Workloads are excessive and the integrity of the service may be compromised. 
    • Procedures need significant strengthening; or
    • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,

?For example:
  • Two or more Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.

Table of Evidence

Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
    • Program staffing chart that includes lines of supervision
    • List of program personnel that includes:
      1. name  
      2. title
      3. degree held and/or other credentials
      4. FTE or volunteer
      5. length of service at the organization
      6. time in current position
    • Table of contents of training curricula
    • Procedures and criteria used for assigning and evaluating workloads
    • Documentation of agency recognition and staff accreditation by Board of Immigration Appeals or evidence of a valid law license
    • Job descriptions including volunteers, as applicable
    • Training curricula
    • Documentation of training
    • Law library resources/materials 
    • Interview:
      1. Supervisors 
      2. Personnel 
    • Review personnel records

  • ILS 6.01

    The organization either has a licensed attorney on staff or is recognized by, and employs staff or has volunteers accredited by, the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) of the U.S. Department of Justice.

    Interpretation: The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 8 CFR §1292.2(a) specifies qualifications of organizations to be recognized. The standard is: “A non-profit religious, charitable, social service or similar organization established in the United States and recognized as such by the Board may designate a representative or representatives to practice before the Board. Such organization must establish to the satisfaction of the Board that: (1) It makes only nominal charges and assesses no excessive membership dues for persons given assistance; and (2) It has at its disposal adequate knowledge, information and experience.” Section 1292.2(d) of 8 CFR states that accredited representatives must be “of good moral character.” 


  • ILS 6.02

    Immigration legal services, including screening, information and other direct services, are provided by personnel who are competent in and/or have received training on: 
    1. immigration law, policies, and procedures; 
    2. legal ethics and client confidentiality; and
    3. referral mechanisms to help service recipients with immigration issues.

    Interpretation: Legal service providers should be aware of and follow the ethics outlined by their State Bar.


  • ILS 6.03

    Supervisors provide case management, oversight, and appropriate support to staff.  

    Interpretation: If supervisors are not knowledgeable in immigration law, staff have access to technical assistance and quality control through another individual or organization. 


  • ILS 6.04

    Legal staff members and volunteers: 
    1. have adequate knowledge, information, training, and experience in immigration law; 
    2. meet high standards of ethical and moral conduct;  
    3. have BIA accreditation, unless they are licensed attorneys; 
    4. maintain their BIA accreditation and have access to regular, ongoing training on immigration law; and
    5. have access to up-to-date immigration law library resources and materials.


  • ILS 6.05

    Personnel maintain a manageable workload and assignments are made and reviewed regularly with due consideration for: 
    1. the qualifications and competencies of direct service personnel and supervisors; 
    2. case complexity; 
    3. case status, and progress toward achievement of desired outcomes; and
    4. special assessment, service planning, treatment and legal issues involved in caring for vulnerable populations such as  children, youth, survivors of domestic violence, and trafficked individuals, as applicable.

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