WHO IS ACCREDITED?

Private Organization Accreditation

Money Management International is a nationwide nonprofit organization that provides counseling and education related to credit, housing and bankruptcy, and offers debt management assistance if needed. MMI also conducts community education programs in the areas where we have a physical presence.
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ORGANIZATION TESTIMONIAL

Holy Family Institute

Sister Linda Yankoski, President/CEO

The Council On Accreditation provides all stakeholders involved in the delivery of social services the assurance that the organization is credible, effective, and is committed to quality improvement. The COA process is an important tool for anyone involved in leading an organization to establish best practices and maintaining and updating these practices over time.
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Purpose

Intercountry Adoption Services establish a permanent family for children who cannot be cared for or adopted in their country of origin and increase the well-being of adopted individuals and adoptive families.

ICA 10: Personnel

Personnel are qualified to perform their jobs, are well trained, and are supervised by qualified professionals.

Rating Indicators
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g., 
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised.
    • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to staff without the listed qualifications.
    • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them.
  • With some exceptions staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth.
    • A few personnel have not yet received required training.
    • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions.
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
    • Supervisors provide structure and support in relation to service outcomes, organizational culture and staff retention.
  • With a few exceptions caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards.
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services, and are adjusted as necessary in accord with established workload procedures.
    • Procedures need strengthening.
    • With few exceptions procedures are understood by staff and are being used.
  • With a few exceptions specialized staff are retained as required and possess the required qualifications.
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • One of the Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.
  • A significant number of staff, e.g., direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers, do not possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result the integrity of the service may be compromised.
    • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur.
    • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications.
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training documentation is poorly maintained.
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements.
  • Workloads are excessive and the integrity of the service may be compromised. 
    • Procedures need significant strengthening; or
    • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,

?For example:
  • Two or more Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.

Table of Evidence

Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
    • Program staffing chart that includes lines of supervision
    • List of program personnel that includes:
      1. name;
      2. title;
      3. degree held and/or other credentials;
      4. FTE or volunteer;
      5. length of service at the organization;
      6. time in current position
    • Chart that specifies caseload size, per worker for the past six months
    • Procedures or criteria used for assigning and evaluating workloads
    • Table of contents of orientation and training curricula
    • Job descriptions
    • Documentation of training
    • Training curricula
    • Interview:
      1. Supervisors
      2. Personnel
    • Review personnel files

  • ICA 10.01

    Adoption workers are qualified by:

    1. an advanced degree in social work or a comparable human service field; or
    2. a bachelor’s degree in social work or a comparable human service field with prior experience working with children and families, preferably in the field of adoption.

  • ICA 10.02

    Supervisors or experienced personnel provide additional supervision and support when personnel are new or are still developing competencies.


  • ICA 10.03

    Supervisory personnel are qualified by:

    1. an advanced degree in social work or a comparable human service field;
    2. professional licensure, when required; and
    3. professional experience in intercountry adoption.

  • ICA 10.04

    Supervisory and adoption workers are knowledgeable about:

    1. impacts of adoption on children and families, and the characteristics of successful adoptive families;
    2. separation and loss from family and community of origin;
    3. attachment and bonding;
    4. child development and life cycle phases and effects of institutionalization;
    5. post-traumatic stress disorder;
    6. how adoption impacts identity formation;
    7. applicable state, federal, and international regulations governing intercountry adoption; and
    8. the culture and adoption process of relevant sending countries.

  • ICA 10.05

    All new personnel, including any overseas staff or independent contractors, receive appropriate orientation and training that includes:

    1. the organization’s goals, services, policies, and procedures;
    2. the costs and fees of intercountry adoption services;
    3. the cultural diversity of the service population;
    4. respect for the confidentiality of persons served;
    5. the lines of accountability and authority within the organization; and
    6. the organization’s ethical and professional expectations.

  • ICA 10.06

    The organization determines the appropriate amount and type of in-service training needed to ensure that personnel remain current on adoption trends and practice issues.


  • ICA 10.07

    Adoption workers maintain a manageable workload, and cases are assigned according to a standardized system that takes into consideration:

    1. the qualifications and competencies of the worker and the supervisor;
    2. the complexity and status of the case;
    3. services provided by other professionals or team members; and
    4. other organizational responsibilities.

    Interpretation: Caseloads generally do not exceed 35 families.

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