WHO IS ACCREDITED?

Private Organization Accreditation

One Hope United offers a range of services aimed at our mission of "Protecting children and strengthening families" including early childhood education, early intervention and prevention, family preservation, foster care, residential, and adoption.
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ORGANIZATION TESTIMONIAL

Catholic Charities, Diocese of Covington

Wm. R. (Bill) Jones, ACSW, MDiv, Chief Executive Officer

Catholic Charities in Covington has been COA accredited since 1996. Though the time spent in completing the self study and hosting the site visit can sometimes feel sometimes daunting, the rewards far outweigh the effort. In our agency, the self-study is a group process that involves every member of the staff from the CEO to the building maintenance staff.
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Purpose

Individuals who receive Home Care and Support Services obtain a maximum level of independence, functioning, and health, and extend the time it is possible to live safely at home and in the community.

HCS 9: Personnel Qualfications and Supervision

Care providers are qualified to deliver services provided and work with the supervision of a trained professional.

Rating Indicators
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g., 
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised.
    • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to staff without the listed qualifications.
    • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them.
  • With some exceptions staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth.
    • A few personnel have not yet received required training.
    • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions.
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
    • Supervisors provide structure and support in relation to service outcomes, organizational culture and staff retention.
  • With a few exceptions caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards.
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services, and are adjusted as necessary in accord with established workload procedures.
    • Procedures need strengthening.
    • With few exceptions procedures are understood by staff and are being used.
  • With a few exceptions specialized staff are retained as required and possess the required qualifications.
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • One of the Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.
  • A significant number of staff, e.g., direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers, do not possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result the integrity of the service may be compromised.
    • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur.
    • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications.
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training documentation is poorly maintained.
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements.
  • Workloads are excessive and the integrity of the service may be compromised. 
    • Procedures need significant strengthening; or
    • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,

?For example:
  • Two or more Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.

Table of Evidence

Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
    • Program staffing chart that includes lines of supervision
    • List of program personnel that includes:
      1. name;
      2. title;
      3. degree held and/or other credentials;
      4. FTE or volunteer;
      5. length of service at the organization;
      6. time in current position
    • Procedures and criteria used for assigning and evaluating workloads
    • Job descriptions
    • Health evaluation procedures
    • Coverage schedules
    • Interview:
      1. Supervisors
      2. Personnel
    • Review personnel files

  • HCS 9.01

    Organizations that screen and hire home care workers ensure applicants meet state requirements, and are qualified in their ability to:

    1. meet minimum age and applicable background check requirements;
    2. read, understand, and carry out written and verbal care plan directions;
    3. perform personal care and housekeeping tasks and activities in the care plan;
    4. exercise good judgment and tact in responding to an individual’s suggestions and preferences;
    5. monitor and accurately record and report changes in an individual’s condition;
    6. contribute observations and recommendations at care plan conferences or to supervisors; and
    7. meet the training requirements for the position and services performed.

    Interpretation: State law may specify minimum education requirements and mandatory criminal background checks and fingerprinting for applicants filling state funded positions, and may specify grounds for disqualification for employment related to prior experience working with vulnerable populations.


  • HCS 9.02

    Direct care workers are:

    1. experienced in providing services to the population served;
    2. able to work as a member of a care team;
    3. comfortable and competent working in a client-centered service delivery environment;
    4. mature, reliable, flexible, and supportive; and
    5. able to adapt to a range of in-home care circumstances.

  • HCS 9.03

    Direct care workers have access to a supervisor or other professional at all times while on duty, and have the support of a supervisor who visits the individual’s home.

    Note: See HCS 5.01 for timeframes for supervisory home visits.


  • HCS 9.04

    Personnel who conduct client screening, level of care assessments and periodic re-assessments, care management and coordination, and supervision of direct care providers are qualified by:

    1. a bachelor’s degree in a related human services field;
    2. a minimum of two years of experience working with the service population; and
    3. demostrated competence providing care decisions for in home service delivery.

    Interpretation: Individuals can demonstrate competence through a combination of appropriate supervision by an individual with an advanced degree, specialized training, experience, and skills.


  • HCS 9.05

    Supervisors have:

    1. experience working with the service population and formal training in supervision; and/or
    2. on-the-job supervisory training for the first three months of service as a supervisor.

  • FP
    HCS 9.06

    The organization coordinating and delivering services provides all individuals with:

    1. a care provider who is trained and qualified to deliver appropriate services;
    2. a supervising social service or health professional, as appropriate; and
    3. other service personnel, as needed.

  • FP
    HCS 9.07

    Personnel maintain a manageable workload and assignments are made with due consideration for:

    1. the qualifications and competencies of direct service personnel and supervisors;
    2. case complexity;
    3. case status and progress toward achievement of desired outcomes;
    4. length and strength of worker-client relationship;
    5. whether services are provided by multiple individuals and providers or teams;
    6. ability of direct service personnel to meet the individual’s or family’s needs; and
    7. relevant cultural and religious factors.

    Research Note: A large state-wide study of factors associated with home care elder abuse and neglect found type and stability of client-home care worker relationship, and turnover, associated with higher risk for neglect, yelling and material abuse. Family ties and informal support, worker-client relationship and language compatibility, and provider turnover to be as significant for positive outcomes as service delivery model.


  • HCS 9.08

    Prior to providing in-home services, personnel receive a health evaluation that meets state requirements to determine their ability to perform the essential functions of the job, with or without reasonable accommodation.

    Interpretation: Evaluating the ability of personnel to perform the essential functions of the job may include checking that the individual is capable of lifting fifty pounds and of climbing stairs.

    NA The organization provides homemaker services only.

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