WHO IS ACCREDITED?

Private Organization Accreditation

Germaine Lawrence is a residential treatment center for girls ages 12-18 with complex behavioral, psychological and learning challenges.   Girls live at our programs while receiving special education, individual, family and group therapy; psychiatric and primary medical care; and a wide variety of therapeutic activities and interventions.
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ORGANIZATION TESTIMONIAL

ClearPoint Credit Counseling Solutions

Tim Spearin, Vice President, Quality Assurance

ClearPoint Credit Counseling Solutions has been accredited by the Council on Accreditation (COA) since 1996.  Reaccreditation attests that a member organization continues to meet the highest national operating standards as set by the COA.  It also provides assurance that ClearPoint Credit Counseling Solutions is performing services which the community needs, conducting its operations and funds successfully.
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Purpose

Early Childhood Education facilitates appropriate child development and ensures the health and safety of children in care.

ECE 11: Personnel

Teaching staff and their supervisors are trained and qualified to perform their job responsibilities.

Rating Indicators
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g., 
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised.
    • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to staff without the listed qualifications.
    • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them.
  • With some exceptions staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth.
    • A few personnel have not yet received required training.
    • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions.
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
    • Supervisors provide structure and support in relation to service outcomes, organizational culture and staff retention.
  • With a few exceptions caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards.
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services, and are adjusted as necessary in accord with established workload procedures.
    • Procedures need strengthening.
    • With few exceptions procedures are understood by staff and are being used.
  • With a few exceptions specialized staff are retained as required and possess the required qualifications.
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • One of the Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.
  • A significant number of staff, e.g., direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers, do not possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result the integrity of the service may be compromised.
    • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur.
    • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications.
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training documentation is poorly maintained.
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements.
  • Workloads are excessive and the integrity of the service may be compromised. 
    • Procedures need significant strengthening; or
    • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,

?For example:
  • Two or more Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.

Table of Evidence

Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
    • Program staffing chart that includes lines of supervision
    • List of program personnel that includes:
      1. name;
      2. title;
      3. degree held and/or other credentials;
      4. FTE or volunteer;
      5. length of service at the organization;
      6. time in current position
    • Table of contents of training curricula
    • A description of supervision and support provided to teaching staff
    • Job descriptions
    • Documentation of training
    • Data describing staff turnover
    • Documentation of quarterly professional development opportunities and resources
    • Interview:
      1. Supervisors
      2. Teaching staff
    • Review personnel files

  • ECE 11.01

    Teaching staff:

    1. are at least 18 years of age; and
    2. meet federal, state, or local requirements for minimum education.

  • ECE 11.02

    The program director has assessed competence in administering an early childhood education program and is qualified by:

    1. a bachelor’s degree in a related field with two years of post-graduate experience in early childhood education or a related field;
    2. a bachelor’s degree in an unrelated field with five years of post-graduate experience in early childhood education or a related field; or
    3. a bachelor’s degree in an unrelated field with a state-approved directors credential.

    Interpretation: Related fields include early childhood education, child development, elementary education, early childhood special education, psychology, family consumer sciences, home economics, social work, program administration, and social services.


  • ECE 11.03

    Teachers have, or are actively working towards:

    1. a Child Development Associate (CDA) credential, Certified Childcare Professional (CCP) credential, or equivalent;
    2. an associate’s degree in early childhood education or child development; or
    3. a bachelor’s degree in a related field with two years of post-graduate experience in early childhood education.

    Interpretation: Related fields include early childhood education, child development, elementary education, early childhood special education, psychology, family consumer sciences, home economics, social work, and social services.

    Research Note: Research has shown that caregiver education and training in child development is related to children’s developmental outcomes. Teaching staff with higher education levels engaged more positively with children, leading to higher quality of care and improved developmental outcomes. As a result, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Public Health Association recommend formal post-high school training including certification or college degree in child development, education, or a related field.


  • ECE 11.04

    Assistant teachers:

    1. have a high school diploma or GED; and
    2. carry out classroom activities under the direct supervision of an appropriately qualified teacher.

  • FP
    ECE 11.05

    Teaching staff receive an orientation and ongoing training to meet the health, safety, and nutritional needs of children, including:

    1. child abuse and neglect prevention, detection, and reporting;
    2. food preparation, storage, and service;
    3. hand-washing and diapering procedures, if applicable;
    4. safe sleep practices including SIDS prevention procedures, if applicable;
    5. sanitation and proper handling and storage of disinfectants;
    6. recognizing the signs and symptoms of conditions that may require specialized services, additional screenings, or referrals including mental health or developmental delays; and
    7. policies and procedures regarding contagious and infectious disease prevention.

    Interpretation: If teaching staff use gloves while changing diapers, training on diapering procedures must include how to properly use and dispose of them.

    Interpretation: Pre-service orientation should prepare the individual to perform his or her role at the organization. Teaching staff should never be expected to perform a task or provide a level of care that they have not been properly trained to handle.

  • FP
    ECE 11.06

    Teaching staff receive an orientation and ongoing training to provide culturally responsive care including:

    1. exploration of their own biases and their effect on interactions with children and families;
    2. information on varying beliefs, customs, values, and child rearing practices of the different cultural groups represented by the children in their care;
    3. how to communicate openly and work respectfully with families of other cultures;
    4. information on cultural dynamics; and
    5. the role that culture plays in child development.

  • ECE 11.07

    Teaching staff receive an orientation and ongoing training in early childhood development and education including:

    1. curriculum training to ensure consistent implementation;
    2. how to support a child’s positive relationships with his or her peers;
    3. positive guidance techniques of behavior management;
    4. classroom activities appropriate to children of different developmental levels;
    5. recognizing developmental differences between children;
    6. skills for working with children with special needs;
    7. use of screening and/or assessment tools;
    8. skills in observation and documentation;
    9. effective classroom management; and
    10. teaching strategies for working with young children.

    Interpretation: Teaching strategies include:

    1. techniques for keeping children engaged and motivated;
    2. methods for evaluating the effectiveness of teaching strategies and the comprehension of the child;
    3. methods for working with small or large groups;
    4. teacher-directed and child-directed instruction;
    5. how to choose activities and materials;
    6. how to break down tasks into manageable components; and
    7. how to organize instruction to achieve developmental milestones.

    Research Note: Studies have shown that curriculum implementation is often inconsistent without proper training and technical assistance. A study of preschoolers attending 14 Hartford, Connecticut child care centers found that children who received care from teachers with intensive curriculum training and support demonstrated improved school readiness.

    Research Note: When teaching staff are responsible for conducting comprehensive developmental screenings, they should be properly trained. Comprehensive developmental screenings include instruments that measure general and social-emotional development. The screenings help identify children who may have developmental delays or disabilities so they can be connected to relevant resources or more specialized screenings. Research shows that early intervention is key to future success and achievement of positive outcomes. Not all organizations will offer developmental screenings on-site. Many will refer families to outside providers for screening when there are concerns. See ECE 8.01 for more information on referring children with special needs to needed support services.


  • ECE 11.08

    Training provided is specific to job positions or categories, and:

    1. includes topics that are relevant to job descriptions;
    2. reflects the level of relevant experience and formal education obtained by teaching staff;
    3. ensures teaching staff remain up-to-date on current practices in early childhood education; and
    4. includes at least 24 training hours per year.

    Interpretation: Training hours should be adjusted each year given the assessed training needs of teaching staff. See TS 1.03 for more information on maintaining a professional development program that meets the needs of staff. Most states regulate the number of annual training hours and training topics required for early childhood education teaching staff, so organizations should familiarize themselves with requirements in their state and adjust their training program accordingly.

    Training may be delivered using a variety of methods based on identified training needs and available resources. Examples of training delivery methods include:

    1. adult education courses;
    2. higher education or college courses;
    3. reading and audio-visual materials;
    4. conference workshops;
    5. distance learning; and
    6. in-service training.

  • ECE 11.09

    Supervisors provide ongoing support and guidance including:

    1. ongoing learning opportunities through mentoring, coaching, and classroom observation and feedback; and
    2. recognizing the signs and symptoms of depression, stress, low-energy, or burn-out.

    Research Note: Teaching staff suffering from depression, stress, or low-energy may have difficulty forming secure attachments with the children in their care, leading to poor developmental outcomes.


  • ECE 11.10

    Professional development opportunities and resources are provided on at least a quarterly basis and include:

    1. group meetings for joint problem-solving and mutual support;
    2. information sharing on child development and parent-child relationships;
    3. opportunities for teaching staff to plan together; and
    4. orientation for incoming teaching staff and regular in-service training.

    Research Note: In-service training is critical to providing high quality child care. Strong professional development programs will include a thorough orientation program for incoming teaching staff; comprehensive, systematic, ongoing trainings; and regular supervision, mentoring, and classroom observation by a highly trained professional. Organization leadership can make professional development opportunities more flexible by offering trainings electronically, providing coverage during the work day so teaching staff can complete trainings, and facilitating more frequent classroom observation with opportunities to provide feedback.

    Research Note: Early childhood education workforce research suggests that with the tremendous growth in the field, it is becoming increasingly difficult to recruit and retain experienced and qualified workers. Low wages and benefits have been cited as obstacles for sufficient recruitment and retention of teaching staff. Early childhood education programs should offer opportunities for teaching staff collaboration and support to prevent burn-out and reduce turnover. Lower turnover rates are associated with improved outcomes among children receiving out-of-home


  • ECE 11.11

    Teaching staff exhibit the:

    1. skills needed to interact and develop meaningful relationships with children, families, colleagues, and supervisors;
    2. energy and flexibility to meet the needs of children; and
    3. personal characteristics to provide children with safe, affectionate, secure, and continuous care.
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