WHO IS ACCREDITED?

Private Organization Accreditation

Children's Home Society of Florida delivers a unique spectrum of social services designed to protect children at risk of abuse, neglect or abandonment; to strengthen and stabilize families; to help young people break the cycle of abuse and neglect; and to find safe, loving homes for children.
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VOLUNTEER TESTIMONIAL

Judy Kay, LCSW

Volunteer Roles: Peer Reviewer; Team Leader

In administration for 22 of 24 years at Child Saving Institute, a COA-accredited not-for-profit child welfare agency in Omaha, Nebraska. Retired approximately two years ago, I moved to Tucson, Arizona, where I advocate for children's rights as a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) volunteer to three young children.
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Purpose

Individuals who receive Domestic Violence Services gain a sense of empowerment, improve their well-being, and increase their ability to live safely and independently.

DV 18: Personnel

Personnel are capable of supporting, empowering, and promoting the safety and independence of survivors.

Rating Indicators
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g., 
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised.
    • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to staff without the listed qualifications.
    • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them.
  • With some exceptions staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth.
    • A few personnel have not yet received required training.
    • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions.
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
    • Supervisors provide structure and support in relation to service outcomes, organizational culture and staff retention.
  • With a few exceptions caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards.
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services, and are adjusted as necessary in accord with established workload procedures.
    • Procedures need strengthening.
    • With few exceptions procedures are understood by staff and are being used.
  • With a few exceptions specialized staff are retained as required and possess the required qualifications.
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • One of the Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.
  • A significant number of staff, e.g., direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers, do not possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result the integrity of the service may be compromised.
    • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur.
    • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications.
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training documentation is poorly maintained.
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements.
  • Workloads are excessive and the integrity of the service may be compromised. 
    • Procedures need significant strengthening; or
    • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,

?For example:
  • Two or more Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.

Table of Evidence

Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
    • Program staffing chart that includes lines of supervision
    • List of personnel that includes:
      1. name;
      2. title;
      3. degree held and/or other credentials;
      4. FTE or volunteer;
      5. length of service at the organization;
      6. time in current position
    • Table of contents of training curricula
    • Procedures and criteria used for assigning and evaluating workloads
    • Job descriptions
    • Documentation of training
    • Training curricula
    • Interview:
      1. Supervisors
      2. Personnel
    • Review personnel files

  • DV 18.01

    Direct service personnel are qualified by:

    1. a bachelor’s degree from an accredited program of social work or a comparable human service field; or
    2. appropriate experience, training, and supervision.

    Interpretation: Appropriate experience can include both work experience and life experience.


  • FP
    DV 18.02

    Personnel have the competencies and support needed to:

    1. engage, empower, and communicate effectively, respectfully, and empathetically with survivors from a wide range of backgrounds, cultures, and perspectives;
    2. assess risks and safety;
    3. develop safety plans;
    4. recognize and address barriers to escaping abuse or accessing services;
    5. recognize the presence of medical or health problems;
    6. recognize and respond to the co-occurrence of domestic violence, substance use conditions, and mental health conditions;
    7. manage stress and intervene in crisis situations;
    8. set appropriate boundaries with survivors;
    9. understand relevant legal and civil rights issues;
    10. coordinate services and collaborate with other providers; and
    11. follow reporting mandates.

    Interpretation: Competency can be demonstrated through a combination of education, training, and experience.

    Interpretation: When the organization serves military or veteran populations, it is essential that staff have the competencies needed to effectively support and assist service members, veterans, and their families, including sufficient knowledge regarding: military culture, values, policies, structure, terminology, unique barriers to service, traumas and signature injuries, co-occurring conditions, effective and evidence-based interventions, applicable regulations, benefits, and other relevant issues. When providers possess the requisite military competency, they are capable of supporting improved communication and more effective care. 

    Signature injuries and co-occurring conditions include post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, traumatic brain injury (TBI), substance abuse, and intimate partner violence. Personnel serving military and veteran populations should have the competencies to identify, assess, and develop a treatment plan for these injuries and conditions.


  • DV 18.03

    Personnel providing services in a group setting have the competencies and support needed to:

    1. engage and motivate group members;
    2. educate group members;
    3. understand group dynamics;
    4. lead discussions; and
    5. facilitate group activities.

    Interpretation: Competency can be demonstrated through a combination of education, training, and experience.

    NA The organization does not provide services in a group setting.


  • FP
    DV 18.04

    Personnel who work directly with children, or with survivors who have children, are knowledgeable about:

    1. child development;
    2. possible effects of witnessing domestic violence;
    3. signs and symptoms of, and reporting requirements for, child abuse and neglect;
    4. collaborating with child protective services; and
    5. non-violent discipline methods.

    NA The organization does not serve survivors who have children.


  • DV 18.05

    The individual who has administrative responsibility for the direct delivery of services has a bachelor’s degree and two years’ experience working with survivors, at a minimum.


  • DV 18.06

    The individual who has administrative responsibility for shelter operations has:

    1. at least a bachelor’s degree or equivalent and two years’ experience in human services; or
    2. substantial experience in human services, including at least two years’ experience in shelter services.

    NA The organization does not provide shelter services.


  • DV 18.07

    Employee workloads support the achievement of positive outcomes for survivors, are regularly reviewed, and are based on an assessment of the following:

    1. the qualifications, competencies, and experience of the provider, including the level of supervision needed;
    2. the work and time required to accomplish assigned tasks and job responsibilities; and
    3. service volume, accounting for assessed level of needs of new and current survivors and referrals.
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