WHO IS ACCREDITED?

Private Organization Accreditation

Southeastern Regional Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services is a Local Management Entity, covering the geographic areas of Bladen, Columbus, Robeson, and Scotland counties. SER ensures continuity of care to consumers through access to a quality of care system available 24/7/365 days a year through management of our network provider services.
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VOLUNTEER TESTIMONIAL

Judy Kay, LCSW

Volunteer Roles: Peer Reviewer; Team Leader

In administration for 22 of 24 years at Child Saving Institute, a COA-accredited not-for-profit child welfare agency in Omaha, Nebraska. Retired approximately two years ago, I moved to Tucson, Arizona, where I advocate for children's rights as a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) volunteer to three young children.
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Purpose

Community Change Initiatives mobilize the community for action; strengthen the capacity of residents and organizations to effect and sustain change; build and improve neighborhoods; and lay the groundwork for future progress.

CCI 8: Personnel

Personnel have the training, skills, experience, and knowledge needed to build community capacity and promote community change.

Rating Indicators
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g., 
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised.
    • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to staff without the listed qualifications.
    • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them.
  • With some exceptions staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth.
    • A few personnel have not yet received required training.
    • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions.
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
    • Supervisors provide structure and support in relation to service outcomes, organizational culture and staff retention.
  • With a few exceptions caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards.
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services, and are adjusted as necessary in accord with established workload procedures.
    • Procedures need strengthening.
    • With few exceptions procedures are understood by staff and are being used.
  • With a few exceptions specialized staff are retained as required and possess the required qualifications.
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • One of the Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.
  • A significant number of staff, e.g., direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers, do not possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result the integrity of the service may be compromised.
    • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur.
    • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications.
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training documentation is poorly maintained.
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements.
  • Workloads are excessive and the integrity of the service may be compromised. 
    • Procedures need significant strengthening; or
    • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,

For example:
  • Two or more Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.

Table of Evidence

Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
    • List of personnel that includes:
      1. name;
      2. title;
      3. degree held and/or other credentials;
      4. FTE or volunteer;
      5. length of service at the organization;
      6. time in current position
    • Table of contents of training curricula
    • Procedures and criteria for assigning and evaluating workloads
    • Program staffing chart that includes lines of supervision
    • Job descriptions
    • Training curricula
    • Documentation of training
    • Interview:
      1. Program director
      2. Relevant personnel
    • Review personnel files

  • CCI 8.01

    Personnel have the competencies needed to:

    1. engage and build trusting relationships with community members;
    2. communicate effectively with relevant stakeholders;
    3. adapt to changing situations and environments;
    4. assess community characteristics, assets, needs, and priorities;
    5. capitalize on assets and strengths within a community;
    6. understand and interpret data, including measuring progress towards achievement of desired outcomes;
    7. develop and monitor implementation of results-oriented community plans;
    8. lead and facilitate meetings and discussions;
    9. manage groups and resolve conflicts;
    10. build coalitions among community residents, associations, and institutions;
    11. develop networks with groups outside the community that can advance the initiative;
    12. understand and work within relevant financial and administrative infrastructures;
    13. understand and implement projects related to the focus and priorities of the initiative (e.g., improving infrastructure, preventing substance use, promoting public safety, etc.);
    14. work with stakeholders in a culturally competent manner that considers gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, developmental level, disability, and other relevant characteristics; 
    15. engage in community work without maintaining a high profile or dominating the initiative’s public presence, and
    16. promote the sustainability of results.

    Interpretation: Competence can be demonstrated through a combination of education, training, and experience, including life experience. Some states may offer or require licensing, certification, or credentialing for personnel in this field.

    Note: As referenced in COA’s standards for “Human Resources” (HR) and “Training and Supervision” (TS), personnel may include paid employees or volunteers.


  • CCI 8.02

    The organization supports personnel by:

    1. arranging flexible work schedules; and
    2. discussing challenges and struggles facing the community and the initiative.

  • CCI 8.03

    Personnel include members of the community who:

    1. are knowledgeable about community dynamics;
    2. remain objective, fair, and flexible when working with other community members;
    3. support a culture of consensus-building;
    4. respect confidentiality; and
    5. demonstrate a long-term commitment to the community and the initiative’s goals.

  • CCI 8.04

    Employee workloads support the achievement of positive community outcomes, are regularly reviewed, and are based on an assessment of the following:

    1. the qualifications, competencies, and experience of personnel; and
    2. the amount of work and time required to accomplish assigned tasks and responsibilities.
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