WHO IS ACCREDITED?

Private Organization Accreditation

Heartland for Children is the not-for-profit agency responsible for the foster care system in Polk, Highlands, and Hardee Counties.
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VOLUNTEER TESTIMONIAL

Bonnie Bagley

Volunteer Roles: Evaluator; Lead Evaluator; Peer Reviewer; Team Leader

I have found that being a COA Volunteer builds my professional skills and experience in ways that more traditional workshops do not. The opportunity to learn about best practices through the COA standards and then see how agencies implement them is truly a growth experience.
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Purpose

Refugees acquire the cross-cultural information, skills, and social support network needed to gain stability, make a positive personal and social adjustment, maintain family connections and well-being, and achieve educational, economic and civic participation goals.

CA-RRS 11: Personnel

Personnel and volunteers with specialized qualifications provide resettlement services under the supervision of trained professionals.

Rating Indicators
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,  
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised.
    • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to staff without the listed qualifications.
    • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them.
  • With some exceptions staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth.
    • A few personnel have not yet received required training.
    • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions.
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
    • Supervisors provide structure and support in relation to service outcomes, organizational culture and staff retention.
  • With a few exceptions caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards.
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services, and are adjusted as necessary in accord with established workload procedures.
    • Procedures need strengthening.
    • With few exceptions procedures are understood by staff and are being used.
  • With a few exceptions specialized staff are retained as required and possess the required qualifications.
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • One of the Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.
  • A significant number of staff, e.g., direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers, do not possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result the integrity of the service may be compromised.
    • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur.
    • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications.
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training documentation is poorly maintained.
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements.
  • Workloads are are excessive and the integrity of the service may be compromised. 
    • Procedures need significant strengthening; or
    • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,

For example:
  • Two or more Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.

Table of Evidence

Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
    • Program staffing chart that includes lines of supervision
    • List of program personnel that includes:
      1. name  
      2. title
      3. degree held and/or other credentials
      4. FTE or volunteer
      5. length of service at the organization
      6. time in current position
    • Table of contents of training curricula
    • Procedures and criteria used for assigning and evaluating workloads
    • Job descriptions including paraprofessionals, as applicable
    • Documentation of training
    • Training curricula
    • Interview:
      1. Supervisors
      2. Relevant personnel
    • Review personnel records

  • FP
    CA-RRS 11.01

    Resettlement services are provided by personnel who are competent in and/or have received training to: 
    1. understand salient factors in the resettlement process; and
    2. recognize conflicts inherent to acculturation.

    Interpretation: Personnel should receive training on resettlement dynamics in order to fully understand the resettlement process and recognize conflicts inherent to acculturation.


  • CA-RRS 11.02

    Paraprofessionals who have a background in common with service recipients: 
    1. receive consideration as an asset and possible resource; 
    2. have job roles that are clearly defined; and 
    3. receive the training and supervision necessary to provide a source of encouragement for service recipients and to act as an effective bridge between different cultures.

    Interpretation: Paraprofessionals work collaboratively with other trained professionals.

    NA The organization does not employ or invite paraprofessionals to contribute to service delivery.


  • CA-RRS 11.03

    Personnel working in any part of a service delivery system that offers services to refugee children, are prepared by experience and training to: 
    1. recognize obstacles to service delivery based on differences with service recipients; 
    2. learn about unique difficulties encountered in a child’s and family’s migration experience; 
    3. work within the cultural practices and expectations of the child’s and family’s society of origin; 
    4. recognize parents’ customary sources of support, the loss of such support, and any reservations about involvement with public agencies and service providers; and 
    5. incorporate approaches that have proven successful in programs serving refugees and, as applicable, separated refugee minor children.


  • CA-RRS 11.04

    Supervisors are qualified by:  
    1. experience in resettlement services; 
    2. the skills to evaluate the ability and readiness of service recipients to cope with a new society;
    3. the ability to mobilize resources to help service recipients in the community; and
    4. an advanced degree in social work or in a related human service field from an accredited institution.

    Interpretation: Supervisors that do not have an advanced degree as outlined in element d. must be qualified to fulfill the required role. Competency can be demonstrated through training, experience, and/or continuing education.


  • CA-RRS 11.05

    Supervisors are knowledgeable about issues that interfere with developing a professional relationship with service recipients and other barriers to service provision for refugees.


  • CA-RRS 11.06

    Personnel maintain a manageable workload and assignments are made and reviewed regularly with due consideration for: 
    1. the qualifications and competencies of direct service personnel and supervisors; 
    2. case complexity; 
    3. case status, and progress toward achievement of desired outcomes; 
    4. whether services are provided by multiple individuals and providers or teams; and
    5. relevant cultural and religious factors.

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