WHO IS ACCREDITED?

Private Organization Accreditation

One Hope United offers a range of services aimed at our mission of "Protecting children and strengthening families" including early childhood education, early intervention and prevention, family preservation, foster care, residential, and adoption.
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VOLUNTEER TESTIMONIAL

Ulysses Arteaga, L.C.S.W.

Volunteer Roles: Commissioner; EPPA; Marine Reviewer; Military Reviewer; Peer Reviewer; Team Leader

The Consuelo Foundation 2012 Peer Reviewer of the Year, Mr. Arteaga conducts two to three site visits a year, often volunteering for visits that require a Spanish speaking peer.
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Purpose

Refugees acquire the cross-cultural information, skills, and social support network needed to gain stability, make a positive personal and social adjustment, maintain family connections and well-being, and achieve educational, economic and civic participation goals.

CA-RRS 11: Personnel

Personnel and volunteers with specialized qualifications provide resettlement services under the supervision of trained professionals.

Rating Indicators
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,  
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised.
    • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to staff without the listed qualifications.
    • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them.
  • With some exceptions staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth.
    • A few personnel have not yet received required training.
    • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions.
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
    • Supervisors provide structure and support in relation to service outcomes, organizational culture and staff retention.
  • With a few exceptions caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards.
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services, and are adjusted as necessary in accord with established workload procedures.
    • Procedures need strengthening.
    • With few exceptions procedures are understood by staff and are being used.
  • With a few exceptions specialized staff are retained as required and possess the required qualifications.
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • One of the Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.
  • A significant number of staff, e.g., direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers, do not possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result the integrity of the service may be compromised.
    • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur.
    • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications.
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training documentation is poorly maintained.
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements.
  • Workloads are are excessive and the integrity of the service may be compromised. 
    • Procedures need significant strengthening; or
    • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,

For example:
  • Two or more Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.

Table of Evidence

Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
    • Program staffing chart that includes lines of supervision
    • List of program personnel that includes:
      1. name  
      2. title
      3. degree held and/or other credentials
      4. FTE or volunteer
      5. length of service at the organization
      6. time in current position
    • Table of contents of training curricula
    • Procedures and criteria used for assigning and evaluating workloads
    • Job descriptions including paraprofessionals, as applicable
    • Documentation of training
    • Training curricula
    • Interview:
      1. Supervisors
      2. Relevant personnel
    • Review personnel records

  • FP
    CA-RRS 11.01

    Resettlement services are provided by personnel who are competent in and/or have received training to: 
    1. understand salient factors in the resettlement process; and
    2. recognize conflicts inherent to acculturation.

    Interpretation: Personnel should receive training on resettlement dynamics in order to fully understand the resettlement process and recognize conflicts inherent to acculturation.


  • CA-RRS 11.02

    Paraprofessionals who have a background in common with service recipients: 
    1. receive consideration as an asset and possible resource; 
    2. have job roles that are clearly defined; and 
    3. receive the training and supervision necessary to provide a source of encouragement for service recipients and to act as an effective bridge between different cultures.

    Interpretation: Paraprofessionals work collaboratively with other trained professionals.

    NA The organization does not employ or invite paraprofessionals to contribute to service delivery.


  • CA-RRS 11.03

    Personnel working in any part of a service delivery system that offers services to refugee children, are prepared by experience and training to: 
    1. recognize obstacles to service delivery based on differences with service recipients; 
    2. learn about unique difficulties encountered in a child’s and family’s migration experience; 
    3. work within the cultural practices and expectations of the child’s and family’s society of origin; 
    4. recognize parents’ customary sources of support, the loss of such support, and any reservations about involvement with public agencies and service providers; and 
    5. incorporate approaches that have proven successful in programs serving refugees and, as applicable, separated refugee minor children.


  • CA-RRS 11.04

    Supervisors are qualified by:  
    1. experience in resettlement services; 
    2. the skills to evaluate the ability and readiness of service recipients to cope with a new society;
    3. the ability to mobilize resources to help service recipients in the community; and
    4. an advanced degree in social work or in a related human service field from an accredited institution.

    Interpretation: Supervisors that do not have an advanced degree as outlined in element d. must be qualified to fulfill the required role. Competency can be demonstrated through training, experience, and/or continuing education.


  • CA-RRS 11.05

    Supervisors are knowledgeable about issues that interfere with developing a professional relationship with service recipients and other barriers to service provision for refugees.


  • CA-RRS 11.06

    Personnel maintain a manageable workload and assignments are made and reviewed regularly with due consideration for: 
    1. the qualifications and competencies of direct service personnel and supervisors; 
    2. case complexity; 
    3. case status, and progress toward achievement of desired outcomes; 
    4. whether services are provided by multiple individuals and providers or teams; and
    5. relevant cultural and religious factors.

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