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Private Organization Accreditation

Debt Education and Certification Foundation (DECAF), a private non-profit 501(c)(3) organization, provides high-quality financial education and counseling, with nationwide outreach throughout the U.S. DECAF is HUD-approved, and recognized as one of the 100 Best Companies to Work for in Texas.
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ORGANIZATION TESTIMONIAL

Brewer-Porch Children's Center

James W. Thompson, Executive Director

The COA standards as applied to the operations at Brewer-Porch Children’s Center at The University of Alabama has given the administration an opportunity to examine best practice and improve the quality of care provided to clients.
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Purpose

Respite Care reduces caregiver stress, promotes the well-being and safety of care recipients, and contributes to stable families.

CA-RC 11: Personnel

Respite care providers are qualified for, and receive support in, providing temporary care to improve individual and family well-being, reduce caregiver stress, and promote family stability.

Update:

  • Added Evidence - 04/20/18
    Review of respite provider files added to on-site activities.
Rating Indicators
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,  
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised.
    • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to staff without the listed qualifications.
    • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them.
  • With some exceptions staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth.
    • A few personnel have not yet received required training.
    • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions.
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
    • Supervisors provide structure and support in relation to service outcomes, organizational culture and staff retention.
  • With a few exceptions caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards.
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services, and are adjusted as necessary in accord with established workload procedures.
    • Procedures need strengthening.
    • With few exceptions procedures are understood by staff and are being used.
  • With a few exceptions specialized staff are retained as required and possess the required qualifications.
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • One of the Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.
  • A significant number of staff, e.g., direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers, do not possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result the integrity of the service may be compromised.
    • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur.
    • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications.
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training documentation is poorly maintained.
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements.
  • Workloads are are excessive and the integrity of the service may be compromised. 
    • Procedures need significant strengthening; or
    • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,

For example:
  • Two or more Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.

Table of Evidence

Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
    • Program staffing chart that includes lines of supervision
    • List of program personnel that includes:
      1. name;
      2. title;
      3. degree held and/or other credentials;
      4. FTE or volunteer;
      5. length of service at the organization
      6. time in current position
    • Table of contents of training curricula
    • Procedures for screening respite providers
    • Procedures and criteria used for assigning and evaluating workload
    • Job descriptions
    • Documentation of training
    • Training curricula
    • Interview:
      1. Supervisors
      2. Personnel
      3. Respite providers
    • Review personnel and respite provider files

  • CA-RC 11.01

    Respite care providers have the personal characteristics necessary to provide flexible, affectionate care.


  • CA-RC 11.02

    Respite care providers are competent to:

    1. assess the need for additional services;
    2. respect and appreciate the cultural background, heritage, and identity of persons receiving services;
    3. communicate effectively;
    4. identify changes in functioning; and
    5. determine if a crisis situation is imminent and intervene using appropriate resources.

    Interpretation: Competency can be demonstrated through education, training, or experience.


  • CA-RC 11.03

    Respite care providers are skilled in the following areas, as appropriate to the services provided:

    1. methods of engagement;
    2. helping individuals cope with trauma;
    3. identification of medical needs or problems;
    4. the organization’s plans for handling emergencies;
    5. case advocacy;
    6. use of adaptive equipment, such as braces and wheelchairs;
    7. providing personal care, including lifting techniques; and
    8. other areas necessary to serve the target population.

    Interpretation: Skills can be acquired or improved through education, training, or supervision.


  • FP
    CA-RC 11.04

    Providers are screened and approved prior to having contact with families to ensure they are able to provide the type of care needed, and screenings include:

    1. a criminal record check for all adults living in the provider’s home; and
    2. relevant caregiving experience.

    Interpretation: Record checks are conducted in compliance with applicable law. When a finding of child or adult abuse, neglect, or exploitation is indicated, guidelines are used to determine the appropriateness of provider responsibilities.

    Note: Element (a) is only applicable if respite care is delivered in the provider’s home. 


  • FP
    CA-RC 11.05

    Personnel and respite care providers that provide personal care or basic health services receive a health evaluation prior to providing care to determine their ability to perform the essential functions of the job, with or without reasonable accommodation.

    Update:

    • Revised Standard - 04/20/18
      The standard was revised to clarify applicability to respite care providers. 

    Interpretation: While a physical examination is preferred, personnel may receive a general health screening performed by a qualified medical practitioner, provided that the screening addresses communicable diseases.

    NA The program is not designed to serve individuals with personal care or health services needs. 


  • CA-RC 11.06

    Respite care providers sign a statement agreeing to refrain from the use of corporal punishment and degrading treatment, and receive training and support to promote positive behaviour and implement appropriate discipline techniques.

    Note: Organizations that permit restrictive behaviour management techniques must implement relevant Behaviour Support and Management (CA-BSM) standards.


  • CA-RC 11.07

    Personnel who conduct assessments are qualified by training, skill, and experience, and have the ability to recognize individuals and families with special needs.


  • CA-RC 11.08

    Supervisors have:

    1. an advanced degree in social work or a comparable human service field with one year of relevant experience, or
    2. a bachelor’s degree in social work or a comparable human service field with two years of relevant experience.

  • CA-RC 11.09

    Employee workloads are regularly reviewed and are based on an assessment of the following:

    1. the qualifications, competencies, and experience of the worker, including the level of supervision needed;
    2. the work and time required to accomplish assigned tasks and job responsibilities; and
    3. service volume, accounting for assessed level of needs of new and current clients and referrals.
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