WHO IS ACCREDITED?

Private Organization Accreditation

Lutheran Social Services of New England is a high-performing nonprofit organization. LSS is a powerful difference maker and go-to resource, driving ourselves to constantly anticipate futures that are different from the past. For 140 years, LSS has been caring for people in need in New England.
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ORGANIZATION TESTIMONIAL

ClearPoint Credit Counseling Solutions

Tim Spearin, Vice President, Quality Assurance

ClearPoint Credit Counseling Solutions has been accredited by the Council on Accreditation (COA) since 1996.  Reaccreditation attests that a member organization continues to meet the highest national operating standards as set by the COA.  It also provides assurance that ClearPoint Credit Counseling Solutions is performing services which the community needs, conducting its operations and funds successfully.
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Purpose

Families participating in Child and Family Development and Support Services delivered through strong community partnerships gain new competencies, improve child health and well-being, improve family functioning, and make family-community connections.

CA-CFD 15: Personnel

Program personnel are capable of helping children and families consider options, improve their functioning, and achieve their goals and desired outcomes.

Update:

  • Revised Evidence - 08/15/17
    The scope of the evidence of personnel workloads has been broadened.
Rating Indicators
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,  
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised.
    • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to staff without the listed qualifications.
    • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them.
  • With some exceptions staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth.
    • A few personnel have not yet received required training.
    • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions.
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
    • Supervisors provide structure and support in relation to service outcomes, organizational culture and staff retention.
  • With a few exceptions caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards.
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services, and are adjusted as necessary in accord with established workload procedures.
    • Procedures need strengthening.
    • With few exceptions procedures are understood by staff and are being used.
  • With a few exceptions specialized staff are retained as required and possess the required qualifications.
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • One of the Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.
  • A significant number of staff, e.g., direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers, do not possess the required qualifications, including: education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result the integrity of the service may be compromised.
    • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur.
    • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications.
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training.
    • Training documentation is poorly maintained.
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies.
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements.
  • Workloads are are excessive and the integrity of the service may be compromised. 
    • Procedures need significant strengthening; or
    • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice standards; e.g.,

For example:
  • Two or more Fundamental Practice Standards received a rating of 3 or 4.

Table of Evidence

Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
    • Program staffing chart that includes lines of supervision
    • List of personnel that includes:
      1. name;
      2. title;
      3. degree held and/or other credentials;
      4. FTE or volunteer;
      5. length of service at the organization;
      6. time in current position
    • Table of contents of training curricula
    • Description of average workload, including average caseload size if applicable
    • Procedures and criteria used for assigning cases, and for assigning and evaluating workloads
    • Job descriptions
    • Documentation of training
    • Training curricula
    • Supervision schedule
    • Interview:
      1. Supervisors
      2. Personnel
    • Review personnel files

  • FP
    CA-CFD 15.01

    Program personnel have the competencies needed to:

    1. engage, establish trust, develop relationships, and collaborate effectively with individuals and families from a wide range of backgrounds, cultures, and perspectives;
    2. provide services in a culturally competent manner;
    3. promote respect and encourage independence;
    4. use appropriate methods of support and establish professional boundaries with families;
    5. observe and understand child, individual, and family functioning;
    6. educate families about child development, child rearing, and positive personal development;
    7. identify and build on strengths;
    8. assess needs, risks, and safety;
    9. recognize and address problems related to substance use, mental health, domestic violence, and child abuse and neglect;
    10. recognize and respond to signs of prenatal and postpartum depression;
    11. collaborate with service providers; and
    12. link families with needed services offered by other service providers.

    Interpretation: Competency can be demonstrated through a combination of education, training, and experience.

    Research Note: Studies have found that between 10 and 20 percent of women experience depression either during pregnancy (prenatal) or within 12 months of giving birth (postpartum). A much smaller percentage experience postpartum psychosis. Symptoms of postpartum depression can include: persistent sadness, irritability, lack of self-care, insomnia, fatigue, anxiety, poor bonding with baby, and thoughts of suicide. Maternal depression can be treated successfully, especially if identified early. 

    NA The organization provides only parent education groups.


  • CA-CFD 15.02

    Staff providing early intervention services have the additional competencies needed to:

    1. administer early intervention techniques;
    2. understand issues of particular relevance to the families of children with developmental delays or disabilities; and
    3. help families learn how to support and promote their children’s healthy development.

    Interpretation: Competency can be demonstrated through a combination of education, training, and experience.

    NA The organization does not provide an early intervention program.


  • CA-CFD 15.03

    Program personnel providing parent education services in a group setting have the competencies needed to:

    1. engage and motivate group members;
    2. understand group dynamics;
    3. lead discussions;
    4. facilitate group activities;
    5. collaborate effectively with individuals and families from a wide range of backgrounds, cultures, and perspectives;
    6. provide services in a culturally competent manner;
    7. promote respect and encourage independence;
    8. educate individuals and families about child development, child rearing, and positive personal development; and
    9. recognize family needs and collaborate with community providers.

    Interpretation: Competency can be demonstrated through a combination of education, training, and experience.

    NA The organization does not provide parent education groups.


  • CA-CFD 15.04

    Supervisors are qualified by:

    1. an advanced degree in a relevant health or human service field; or 
    2. a bachelor’s degree in a relevant human service field and two years’ experience working with children and families; or
    3. a two-year diploma in a relevant human services field and at least four years’ experience working with children and families.

    Interpretation: When supervisors are qualified by element (b), prior experience with supervision is desirable.


  • CA-CFD 15.05

    Supervisors provide:

    1. regular support and supervision to all direct service personnel; and
    2. additional support and supervision to personnel who are new or developing competencies or qualifications.

  • FP
    CA-CFD 15.06

    Staff workloads support the achievement of positive outcomes for families, are regularly reviewed, and are based on an assessment of the following:

    1. the qualifications, competencies, and experience of the provider, including the level of supervision needed;
    2. case complexity and status;
    3. the work and time required to accomplish assigned tasks, including those associated with individual caseloads and other job responsibilities;
    4. whether services are provided by multiple professionals or team members; and
    5. service volume, accounting for assessed level of needs of new and current families and referrals.

    Update:

    • Deleted NA - 08/15/17

    Interpretation: Case complexity can take into account: the intensity of child and family needs, the size of the family, travel time, the goal, and the desired outcome of the case.

    When services are provided through a home visiting model, caseloads generally range from 15 – 25 families, depending upon the frequency and intensity of services provided.


  • CA-CFD 15.07

    When multiple service providers are involved, a team approach is used to ensure a comprehensive, integrated approach to service delivery.

    Interpretation: Mechanisms should be in place to facilitate communication and coordination.

    NA The organization does not involve multiple service providers in service delivery.

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