WHO IS ACCREDITED?

Private Organization Accreditation

CSS Healthcare Services provides Community based health services to the young, the elderly and to Individuals with Developmental Disability. Founded in 1997, we have the ability to offer a variety of quality community-based services to our clients, which has greatly contributed to our growth and success.
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VOLUNTEER TESTIMONIAL

Bonnie Bagley

Volunteer Roles: Evaluator; Lead Evaluator; Peer Reviewer; Team Leader

I have found that being a COA Volunteer builds my professional skills and experience in ways that more traditional workshops do not. The opportunity to learn about best practices through the COA standards and then see how agencies implement them is truly a growth experience.
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Purpose

The organization’s administrative and service environments are respectful, caring, safe, and accessible, and contribute to organizational productivity and effective service delivery.

FOC
ASE 5: Tools and Equipment

Safety procedures govern service recipients’ use of equipment, tools, and appliances at the organization’s facilities or in the field and:
  1. personnel evaluate the potential hazards associated with a service recipients use of a particular tool, appliance, or piece of equipment;
  2. identify whether its use is appropriate to the users age and competency level; and 
  3. directly supervise the use of the item by service recipients as necessary.

Interpretation: "Equipment, tools, and appliances" include any item with the potential to cause harm to service recipients if used inappropriately. This can include appliances such as microwaves or coffee makers that could be found in a kitchen or client milieu. It can also include items used for arts and crafts such as scissors, as well as sports and outdoor equipment.

NA Service recipient’s use of tools, appliances, or equipment is limited to the supervised use of common office supplies.

Rating Indicators
1
The organization's practices reflect full implementation of the standard.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement; e.g.,
  • While there are no reported safety concerns, safety procedures could be clarified with respect to one of the standard's elements.
3
Practice requires significant improvement; e.g., 
  • Procedures are not comprehensive, or do not address some tools or appliances, or do not include criteria for evaluating appropriateness; or
  • Safety procedures are not consistently applied among all service-delivery sites, and/ or in the field; or
  • Personnel evaluating potential hazards related to some tools or appliances are not qualified to do so; or
  • Understaffed programs sometimes result in unsupervised use of tools or equipment by service recipients who have been identified as needing such supervision.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all; e.g.
  • At least one of the standard's elements has not been addressed at all; or
  • Service recipients are at risk due to the organization's failure to establish or adhere to safety procedures; or
  • Licensure or certification has been denied or revoked due to failure to meet relevant health and safety codes and regulations.

Table of Evidence

Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
    • Tools maintenance procedures
No On-Site Evidence
    • Interview:
      1. Maintenance personnel
      2. Relevant personnel
    • Observe facility
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